Skip to main content

Cerca

Elementi taggati con: infrared


 

Infrared Distance Measurement with the Raspberry Pi (Sharp GP2Y0A02YK0F)


https://tutorials-raspberrypi.com/infrared-distance-measurement-with-the-raspberry-pi-sharp-gp2y0a02yk0f

Immagine/foto

#adc #carpc #distance sensor #hardware & gpio #infrared #infrared light barrier #ir infra red #mcp3008 #measure distance #measure distances #projects

There are some infrared distance sensors from the manufacturer Sharp, which can be operated very simply with the Raspberry Pi. There are different distance meters, which cover different distance ranges. These modules work similarly to laser distance meters, but with infrared light. There, bundled light is emitted by a transmitter and an analogue voltage is transmitted through a receiver on the basis of the angle of incidence, whereby the distance can be calculated.

In this tutorial, the distance sensor GP2Y0A02YK0F shows how a distance can be determined. This may be useful, e.g. in the car as a car PC (rear view camera distance), as a robot car or in the context of home automation.

Required Hardware Parts – Distance Sensors


Immagine/foto

The IR transmitter is located on the “indented” side (right).

Overall, Sharp has several distance measures in the offer, where it individually should be looked which one is suitable for the task. This tutorial is designed for the Sharp GP2Y0A02YK0F, which is suitable for ranges from 20cm to 150cm. Distances outside this range are not measured correctly.

The following modules are available:

* GP2Y0A02YK0F (20cm – 150cm)

* GP2Y0A41SK0F (4cm – 30cm)

* GP2Y0A21 (10cm – 80cm)

* GP2Y0A710K0F (100cm – 550cm)

If you use a sensor other than the GP2Y0A02YK0F, you may need to adjust the steps. The data sheets are available on the Sharp homepage.

You will also need the following:

* MCP3008 ADC

* Female-female jumper cable

* Breadboard

Operating the Infrared Distance Sensor


This IR sensor needs an input voltage between 4.5V and 5.5V, so it can be perfectly operated with the 5V of the Raspberry Pi. According to the datasheet, a different voltage is applied to the data pin, depending on how far the object measured by the sensor is. This is visible in the following graph:

Immagine/foto

Based on the voltage, the distance between about 15cm and 150cm can be derived relatively accurately.

Connection of the MCP3008


Immagine/foto

Since the outgoing voltage is analog, first we have to “translate” it with an analog-to-digital converter, so that we can evaluate it with the Raspberry Pi. This works best with an MCP3008 ADC.

This device is controlled via the Pi’s SPI bus and has eight channels to which analog voltages can be translated. These are divided into 2 ^ 20 so 1024 areas (0-1023). If the MCP3008 is connected to 3.3V, a signal of 1 means 0.00322V (3.22mV). Since the SPI bus of the Raspberry Pi works on 3.3V, no more power should be applied, otherwise, the GPIOs can be damaged.

The whole circuit looks like this:

Immagine/foto

RaspberryPi

MCP3008

Pin 1 (3.3V)

Pin 16 (VDD)

Pin 1 (3.3V)

Pin 15 (VREF)

Pin 6 (GND)

Pin 14 (AGND)

Pin 23 (SCLK)

Pin 13 (CLK)

Pin 21 (MISO)

Pin 12 (DOUT)

Pin 19 (MOSI)

Pin 11 (DIN)

Pin 24 (CE0)

Pin 10 (CS/SHDN)

Pin 6 (GND)

Pin 9 (DGND)

The distance sensor has only three connections: red (5V), black (GND) and yellow, which is the data pin and connected to the MCP3008 ADC. For some, the alarm bells may sound and ask why a 5V module is connected directly, although the Pi’s SPI bus should not receive more than 3.3V input. The data sheet indicates that the output voltage of the sensor never exceeds 3V (see graph from the data sheet). Anyone who is afraid that something could happen to the Pi can put a voltage divider with 2 resistors in front of it, but this reduces the accuracy and also my used formula would have to be recalculated. In my tests, it never reached voltages above 2.7V (GP2Y0A02YK0F). This may differ for the other Sharp sensors.

Software for Reading the Distance


To control the MCP3008, the SPI bus must be activated. This works as follows:
sudo raspi-config
„8 Advanced Options“ -> „A6 SPI“ -> „Yes“.

After that, you have to confirm the restart.

In some cases, the module (spi-bcm2708) must also be entered in the / etc / modules file. For that just call
sudo nano /etc/modules
and add the following line at the end (if it does not exist):
spi-bcm2807
Now the spidev library can be installed, if it has not already been done:
sudo apt-get install git python-dev

git clone git://github.com/doceme/py-spidev

cd py-spidev/

sudo python setup.py install

Now that we have all the needed packages installed, we can create the script to measure the distance.
sudo nano ir_distance.py
The script has the following content:

We can do it now with (sudo python ir_distance.py), after we aim at an object, the distance is output.

What exactly happens here? First, the analog value (between 0 and 1023) is read out (line 15). However, since we want to know the voltage, the value is divided by 1023 and multiplied by 3.3 (volts).

Attention: In this case, we know (according to the data sheet) that the output voltage never exceeds 2.8V, although we supply the sensor with 5V. Other modules (analog and digital) often return signals with voltages as high as the applied voltage. Failure to do so may result in damage to the Raspberry Pi.

In line 16 of the script, I calculate the tension in centimetres. I have found the formula here and adapted it a little. For this, I have tested different distances and changed the factors a bit so that the calculated distance is as accurate as possible. As I mentioned at the beginning, this formula is only for the Sharp GP2Y0A02YK0F sensor. Since the other sensors provide analog signals in the similar range, this formula needs to be adjusted for the corresponding sensors (if anyone does that, I’d be happy if he posts it below).

Alternatively, one can also interpolate between the areas (data sheet) by storing all clues (volts, distance) and reading out the specific value and calculating the distance to the measured voltage using linear interpolation.

Sooner or later I will have to attach such a module to the inside of the rear window of my car and have a distance meter when parking in reverse – if someone does not yet know what he can do with it Immagine/foto

Immagine/foto

Der Beitrag Infrared Distance Measurement with the Raspberry Pi (Sharp GP2Y0A02YK0F) erschien zuerst auf Raspberry Pi Tutorials.
Infrared Distance Measurement with the Raspberry Pi (Sharp GP2Y0A02YK0F)

 
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
The #DIY-Thermocam is a #do-it-yourself #infrared #camera, based on the popular FLIR Lepton long-wave-infrared array sensor. Everything, from #software to #hardware, is completely #open-source! This allows everyone to modify or extend the functionalities of the device to their own needs!

Features:
- Fast #ARM #Cortex M4 processor (240MHz), based on the popular, #Arduino compatible #Teensy 3.6
- 160 x 120 pixel FLIR Lepton3 long-wave infrared array sensor for live thermographic #images
- Frame rate of up to 9 FPS (US export compliance) over the serial connection, 5 FPS on the device itself
- 2 MP visual camera to capture optical images, that can be used in a combined image
- MLX90614 single point-infrared sensor for high-precision spot temperatures (10° FOV)
- HDMI or analog #video output capabilities (640x480 pixel) over external video output module
- 3 operating modes: thermal only, thermal + visual, video recording
- 18 different color schemes including rainbow, ironblack, grayscale, hot & cold
- 3.2 inch LCD touch #display with bright colors, wide angle and resistive touch
- Save thermal and visual images with a resolution of 640x480 pixels on the device
- Save real-time videos and interval images with different time-lapse settings
- 8GB internal storage, accessible as an exchangeable SD / microSD slot
- 2500 mAh lithium polymer battery for long operation time (4-6 hours)
- Open-source firmware written in Arduino compatible C/C++ code
- Regular #firmware #updates with new features, flashable over a standalone firmware updater
- Standalone thermal viewer application to save high-quality thermal images & videos on the computer
- Fully compatible to the comprehensive thermal analysis software #ThermoVision by Joe-C
- Use simple commands to receive all thermal & configuration data over the #USB serial port with high speed

http://www.diy-thermocam.net
https://github.com/maxritter/DIY-Thermocam



#FOSS #FLOSS #OpenSource #SoftwareLibre #OpenHardware #HardwareLibre #Libre #Free #Freedom

 
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto
The #DIY-Thermocam is a #do-it-yourself #infrared #camera, based on the popular FLIR Lepton long-wave-infrared array sensor. Everything, from #software to #hardware, is completely #open-source! This allows everyone to modify or extend the functionalities of the device to their own needs!

Features:
- Fast #ARM #Cortex M4 processor (240MHz), based on the popular, #Arduino compatible #Teensy 3.6
- 160 x 120 pixel FLIR Lepton3 long-wave infrared array sensor for live thermographic #images
- Frame rate of up to 9 FPS (US export compliance) over the serial connection, 5 FPS on the device itself
- 2 MP visual camera to capture optical images, that can be used in a combined image
- MLX90614 single point-infrared sensor for high-precision spot temperatures (10° FOV)
- HDMI or analog #video output capabilities (640x480 pixel) over external video output module
- 3 operating modes: thermal only, thermal + visual, video recording
- 18 different color schemes including rainbow, ironblack, grayscale, hot & cold
- 3.2 inch LCD touch #display with bright colors, wide angle and resistive touch
- Save thermal and visual images with a resolution of 640x480 pixels on the device
- Save real-time videos and interval images with different time-lapse settings
- 8GB internal storage, accessible as an exchangeable SD / microSD slot
- 2500 mAh lithium polymer battery for long operation time (4-6 hours)
- Open-source firmware written in Arduino compatible C/C++ code
- Regular #firmware #updates with new features, flashable over a standalone firmware updater
- Standalone thermal viewer application to save high-quality thermal images & videos on the computer
- Fully compatible to the comprehensive thermal analysis software #ThermoVision by Joe-C
- Use simple commands to receive all thermal & configuration data over the #USB serial port with high speed

http://www.diy-thermocam.net
https://github.com/maxritter/DIY-Thermocam



#FOSS #FLOSS #OpenSource #SoftwareLibre #OpenHardware #HardwareLibre #Libre #Free #Freedom

 
Immagine/foto

Infrarot-löten / -entlöten mit einer 100W-Halogen-Lampe



Achtung Arbeiten mit Netzspannung und Verletzungsgefahr: Nicht ins direkte oder reflektierende Licht schauen - unbedingt eine Schweißerbrille benutzen! Sonnenbrille reicht nicht! Vorsicht auch mit der Hitze! Ich übernehme keine Verantwortung für irgendwelche gesundheitlichen oder materiellen Schäden!

Mein erster Versuch war mit einer Rotlichtlampe (für Rückenschmerzen etc.) und einer Linse. Das hat nicht funktioniert: der Durchmesser dieser Lampen ist zu groß, die Wärme zu breit verteilt und ich konnte keine passende Linse zum Fokussieren finden.

Eine Infrarotlötstation gibt es ab 200-300€. Bei der Suche nach Modellen ist mir aufgefallen, dass es auch eine Ersatzlampe gibt: diese sieht aus wie eiene Standard-Halogenlampen mit Reflektor, bis auf den IR-Filter. Die Daten sind 12V 100W, für Stiftsockel. Ich war überrascht, dass 100W reichen können. Und warum ein extra Gerät kaufen, wenn man sich mit einfachen Mitteln etwas Physik zunutze machen kann? :) Ein entscheidender Punkt ist, dass Lampe und Reflektor bei Halogenlampen sehr klein sind - also viel Hitze auf kleinem Raum. Bei anderen DIY-Projekten habe ich Baustrahler in Aktion gesehen. Ich möchte aber etwas kompaktes, evtl. auch zum in der Hand halten. 12V erschienen mir unpraktisch, da ich kein Netzteil/Trafo mit fast 10A habe. Also habe ich mich auf die Suche gemacht nach einer 100W 230V Halogenlampe im GU10-Sockel. Auf den Infrarotfilter kann man verzichten, denn rund 92% der abgegebenen Energie bei Glühlampen ist sowieso Wärme = Infrarotstrahlung. Das ganze hat auf Anhieb so gut funktioniert, eine Sammellinse ist nicht mal nötig. Die Wärme wird etwas großflächiger verteilt als bei IR-Lötstationen mit Fokussierung, stört mich aber nicht.

Alles was man braucht: * Schweißerbrille (das Licht ist dermaßen grell, man sieht durch die gut was man lötet) * 100W Halogenlampe in GU-10-Bauform, bzw. wichtig ist ein kleiner Reflektor, ich habe diese benutzt: "OMNILUX GU-10 230V/100W 600h 25°" * evlt. Adapter von GU-10-Sockel auf E27-Gewinde * eine Tischlampe mit E27-Fassung oder eine E27-Fassung zum in der Hand halten

Materialkosten ca. 15€.

Auf dass Wissen frei verfügbar ist und Technik für konstruktive Dinge genutzt wird.

Video:

#elektronik #electronics #hacks #hardware #hardwarehacks #soldering #desolder #desoldering #ir #infrared #diy #seamoansprojects

 
Immagine/foto

Infrarot-löten / -entlöten mit einer 100W-Halogen-Lampe



Achtung Arbeiten mit Netzspannung und Verletzungsgefahr: Nicht ins direkte oder reflektierende Licht schauen - unbedingt eine Schweißerbrille benutzen! Sonnenbrille reicht nicht! Vorsicht auch mit der Hitze! Ich übernehme keine Verantwortung für irgendwelche gesundheitlichen oder materiellen Schäden!

Mein erster Versuch war mit einer Rotlichtlampe (für Rückenschmerzen etc.) und einer Linse. Das hat nicht funktioniert: der Durchmesser dieser Lampen ist zu groß, die Wärme zu breit verteilt und ich konnte keine passende Linse zum Fokussieren finden.

Eine Infrarotlötstation gibt es ab 200-300€. Bei der Suche nach Modellen ist mir aufgefallen, dass es auch eine Ersatzlampe gibt: diese sieht aus wie eiene Standard-Halogenlampen mit Reflektor, bis auf den IR-Filter. Die Daten sind 12V 100W, für Stiftsockel. Ich war überrascht, dass 100W reichen können. Und warum ein extra Gerät kaufen, wenn man sich mit einfachen Mitteln etwas Physik zunutze machen kann? :) Ein entscheidender Punkt ist, dass Lampe und Reflektor bei Halogenlampen sehr klein sind - also viel Hitze auf kleinem Raum. Bei anderen DIY-Projekten habe ich Baustrahler in Aktion gesehen. Ich möchte aber etwas kompaktes, evtl. auch zum in der Hand halten. 12V erschienen mir unpraktisch, da ich kein Netzteil/Trafo mit fast 10A habe. Also habe ich mich auf die Suche gemacht nach einer 100W 230V Halogenlampe im GU10-Sockel. Auf den Infrarotfilter kann man verzichten, denn rund 92% der abgegebenen Energie bei Glühlampen ist sowieso Wärme = Infrarotstrahlung. Das ganze hat auf Anhieb so gut funktioniert, eine Sammellinse ist nicht mal nötig. Die Wärme wird etwas großflächiger verteilt als bei IR-Lötstationen mit Fokussierung, stört mich aber nicht.

Alles was man braucht: * Schweißerbrille (das Licht ist dermaßen grell, man sieht durch die gut was man lötet) * 100W Halogenlampe in GU-10-Bauform, bzw. wichtig ist ein kleiner Reflektor, ich habe diese benutzt: "OMNILUX GU-10 230V/100W 600h 25°" * evlt. Adapter von GU-10-Sockel auf E27-Gewinde * eine Tischlampe mit E27-Fassung oder eine E27-Fassung zum in der Hand halten

Materialkosten ca. 15€.

Auf dass Wissen frei verfügbar ist und Technik für konstruktive Dinge genutzt wird.

Video:

#elektronik #electronics #hacks #hardware #hardwarehacks #soldering #desolder #desoldering #ir #infrared #diy #seamoansprojects