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Elementi taggati con: emacs


 
I used the #Plasma (#KDE) desktop for a while. It worked quite well, but there were too many moving parts and I decided to look for simpler alternatives.

I decided to give a shot again to #AwesomeWM. It was much better than I expected.
* I did not remember that the floating layout was the default one.
* It is also configured much better than I expected.
* As of version 4.0 (included in #Debian #Stretch), multiple screens generally work well without a need for explicit setup.

So I decided to keep it. I also decided to try and replace akregator (the KDE news feed program) with #elfeed (an #Emacs -based RSS reader). It works quite differently and I'm still getting used to it.

Work needed:
* I can't figure out how to move a window to desktop^Wtag 2. For some reason, mod4-shift-2 does nothing.
* Multi-screen still does not work as well as KDE. I need to better configure it.
* Battery and CPU monitors.

 
Immagine/foto

Mis maestros: Drymer, el Emacs en castellano. | Quijote Libre


https://www.quijotelibre.com/2018/10/05/mis-maestros-drymer-el-emacs-en-castellano/

drymer, el protagonista de hoy, autor del gran Blog Bad Daemos, y uno de los animadores de la comunidad de Emacs en castellano, al que siempre encontraras disponible tanto en el grupo de Telegram, como en el imprescindible canal de IRC en freenode #emacs-es.

#Emacs #ñ
Mis maestros: Drymer, el Emacs en castellano.

 
Immagine/foto

A peek at Emacs 24.4: Rectangular selection - Emacs Redux


http://emacsredux.com/blog/2014/01/01/a-peek-at-emacs-24-dot-4-rectangular-selection/

#Emacs

 
Ajustando Tumbleweed y aprendideno iceWM.

Immagine/fotoLa verdad es que el verano es tiempo de relajación, así que cómo os conté en esta entrada anterior he seguido jugueteando con mi portátil y tratando de acercarme más a mi sistema ideal, si es que existe. La verdad es que Tumbleweed con MATE va un poco arrastras en mi portátil y tarda una vida en arrancar, así que pensé en la posibilidad de instalar Openbox pero recordé unas entradas sobre iceWM que había visto en @victorhckinthefreeworld, y ya que lo tenía instalado, allá que me lancé, y lo cierto es que ahora va cómo la seda, aunque aún es lento de arranque. En cuanto a las entradas que comentaba antes, que os dejo en las referencias, solo os comento que las veáis, y me permito avisar que el programa de configuración que cita iceWMCP a mi me ha vuelto loco y no ha sido capaz ni de ponerme la barra de en la parte superior sin estropearla, así que he optado por configurar a mano. Os cuento ...

\#apariencia #emacs #icewm #opensuse #tumbleweed #windows-manager
Publicado originalmente en: https://www.quijotelibre.com/2018/08/23/ajustando-tumbleweed-y-aprendideno-icewm/
Ajustando Tumbleweed y aprendideno iceWM.

Quijote Libre: Ajustando Tumbleweed y aprendideno iceWM. (Quijote Libre)


 
Ajustando Tumbleweed y aprendideno iceWM.

Immagine/fotoLa verdad es que el verano es tiempo de relajación, así que cómo os conté en esta entrada anterior he seguido jugueteando con mi portátil y tratando de acercarme más a mi sistema ideal, si es que existe. La verdad es que Tumbleweed con MATE va un poco arrastras en mi portátil y tarda una vida en arrancar, así que pensé en la posibilidad de instalar Openbox pero recordé unas entradas sobre iceWM que había visto en @victorhckinthefreeworld, y ya que lo tenía instalado, allá que me lancé, y lo cierto es que ahora va cómo la seda, aunque aún es lento de arranque. En cuanto a las entradas que comentaba antes, que os dejo en las referencias, solo os comento que las veáis, y me permito avisar que el programa de configuración que cita iceWMCP a mi me ha vuelto loco y no ha sido capaz ni de ponerme la barra de en la parte superior sin estropearla, así que he optado por configurar a mano. Os cuento ...

\#apariencia #emacs #icewm #opensuse #tumbleweed #windows-manager
Publicado originalmente en: https://www.quijotelibre.com/2018/08/23/ajustando-tumbleweed-y-aprendideno-icewm/
Ajustando Tumbleweed y aprendideno iceWM.

Quijote Libre: Ajustando Tumbleweed y aprendideno iceWM. (Quijote Libre)


 

Setting up a second keyboard for more shortcuts in Emacs


This is a pretty simple hack you can use any keyboard for to have it on the side for commands you use often enough to warrent a keypress but still find it inconvinient to press C-x * or whatever to

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17760255
Posted by yur3i__ (karma: 46)
Post stats: Points: 96 - Comments: 52 - 2018-08-14T17:57:03Z

\#HackerNews #emacs #for #keyboard #more #second #setting #shortcuts
Article content:

This is a pretty simple hack you can use any keyboard for to have it on the side for commands you use often enough to warrent a keypress but still find it inconvinient to press C-x * or whatever to do. I like to have it on the right of my main keyboard for me to quickly reach over to when I need to. I haven?t tested this on a Mac but I?d assume there is a similar process. On windows there is [1]this video from Taran of [2]LinusTechTips though I have not tried this.
Setting the keyboard layout
To do this you need 2 commands xinput and setxkbmap. First run xinput and the output should look something like this:

yur3i :: [~] :: [01:25 am]
$ xinput Virtual core pointer id=2 [master pointer (3)] Virtual core XTEST pointer id=4 [slave pointer (2)] USB Keyboard id=11 [slave pointer (2)] SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad id=13 [slave pointer (2)] TPPS/2 IBM TrackPoint id=14 [slave pointer (2)] Virtual core keyboard id=3 [master keyboard (2)] Virtual core XTEST keyboard id=5 [slave keyboard (3)] Power Button id=6 [slave keyboard (3)] Video Bus id=7 [slave keyboard (3)] Sleep Button id=8 [slave keyboard (3)] Dell Dell USB Keyboard id=9 [slave keyboard (3)] USB Keyboard id=10 [slave keyboard (3)] AT Translated Set 2 keyboard id=12 [slave keyboard (3)] ThinkPad Extra Buttons id=15 [slave keyboard (3)] USB Keyboard id=16 [slave keyboard (3)]
yur3i :: [~] :: [01:25 am]
$

This displays every input device on your system. As I was using a dell keyboard I was able to easily identify that the keyboard I was after is ?Dell Dell USB Keyboard?, note the id number (in my case ?9?) and run

setxkbmap -device 9 -layout ru

This sets the keymap of only keyboard 9 to Russian. Obviously if you need russian characters you will want to set it to a layout where you do not need whatever symbols the alphanumeric cluster types.
Emacs keybindings
Now that the keyboard is configured to be in a Russian layout we can configure emacs to run functions as any other keybinding except using the keys on our new keyboard.

(global-set-key (kbd "?") (lambda() (interactive) (find-file "~/.emacs.d/init.el")))

This binds the z key to open my config file. I like to put some masking tape on the keys and write a label to help me remember. I like to have things like various commonly used files, magit commands, enabling visual line mode and others on this keyboard for examples of what I use it for.
Persisting through reboots
Now this is all well and good for that session but once you reboot you have to find the id of your keyboard and change the layout again. I wrote a regular expression for finding the id of my keyboard (theres probably a better expression but im not the best at them) and wrapped it in a small shell script to automatically set the keyboard up if it is plugged in.

id=$(xinput | grep -Eo "Dell Dell USB Keyboard\s+id=[0-9]{1,4}" | cut -c 45-) if [ "$id" != "" ]
then setxkbmap -device $id -layout ru
fi

I set this to start with my window manager seeing as it seemed to break when I ran it at startx time. Then you are done! Thanks for reading. Many thanks to the people of [3]this thread for helping point me in the right direction with this project.

References

Visible links
1.
2. https://www.youtube.com/user/LinusTechTips
3. https://www.reddit.com/r/emacs/comments/952pmg/this_may_be_going_beyond_reasonable_but_could_i/

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 81 - Loop: 437 - Rank min: 80 - Author rank: 230

 

Setting up a second keyboard for more shortcuts in Emacs


This is a pretty simple hack you can use any keyboard for to have it on the side for commands you use often enough to warrent a keypress but still find it inconvinient to press C-x * or whatever to

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17760255
Posted by yur3i__ (karma: 46)
Post stats: Points: 96 - Comments: 52 - 2018-08-14T17:57:03Z

\#HackerNews #emacs #for #keyboard #more #second #setting #shortcuts
Article content:

This is a pretty simple hack you can use any keyboard for to have it on the side for commands you use often enough to warrent a keypress but still find it inconvinient to press C-x * or whatever to do. I like to have it on the right of my main keyboard for me to quickly reach over to when I need to. I haven?t tested this on a Mac but I?d assume there is a similar process. On windows there is [1]this video from Taran of [2]LinusTechTips though I have not tried this.
Setting the keyboard layout
To do this you need 2 commands xinput and setxkbmap. First run xinput and the output should look something like this:

yur3i :: [~] :: [01:25 am]
$ xinput Virtual core pointer id=2 [master pointer (3)] Virtual core XTEST pointer id=4 [slave pointer (2)] USB Keyboard id=11 [slave pointer (2)] SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad id=13 [slave pointer (2)] TPPS/2 IBM TrackPoint id=14 [slave pointer (2)] Virtual core keyboard id=3 [master keyboard (2)] Virtual core XTEST keyboard id=5 [slave keyboard (3)] Power Button id=6 [slave keyboard (3)] Video Bus id=7 [slave keyboard (3)] Sleep Button id=8 [slave keyboard (3)] Dell Dell USB Keyboard id=9 [slave keyboard (3)] USB Keyboard id=10 [slave keyboard (3)] AT Translated Set 2 keyboard id=12 [slave keyboard (3)] ThinkPad Extra Buttons id=15 [slave keyboard (3)] USB Keyboard id=16 [slave keyboard (3)]
yur3i :: [~] :: [01:25 am]
$

This displays every input device on your system. As I was using a dell keyboard I was able to easily identify that the keyboard I was after is ?Dell Dell USB Keyboard?, note the id number (in my case ?9?) and run

setxkbmap -device 9 -layout ru

This sets the keymap of only keyboard 9 to Russian. Obviously if you need russian characters you will want to set it to a layout where you do not need whatever symbols the alphanumeric cluster types.
Emacs keybindings
Now that the keyboard is configured to be in a Russian layout we can configure emacs to run functions as any other keybinding except using the keys on our new keyboard.

(global-set-key (kbd "?") (lambda() (interactive) (find-file "~/.emacs.d/init.el")))

This binds the z key to open my config file. I like to put some masking tape on the keys and write a label to help me remember. I like to have things like various commonly used files, magit commands, enabling visual line mode and others on this keyboard for examples of what I use it for.
Persisting through reboots
Now this is all well and good for that session but once you reboot you have to find the id of your keyboard and change the layout again. I wrote a regular expression for finding the id of my keyboard (theres probably a better expression but im not the best at them) and wrapped it in a small shell script to automatically set the keyboard up if it is plugged in.

id=$(xinput | grep -Eo "Dell Dell USB Keyboard\s+id=[0-9]{1,4}" | cut -c 45-) if [ "$id" != "" ]
then setxkbmap -device $id -layout ru
fi

I set this to start with my window manager seeing as it seemed to break when I ran it at startx time. Then you are done! Thanks for reading. Many thanks to the people of [3]this thread for helping point me in the right direction with this project.

References

Visible links
1.
2. https://www.youtube.com/user/LinusTechTips
3. https://www.reddit.com/r/emacs/comments/952pmg/this_may_be_going_beyond_reasonable_but_could_i/

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 81 - Loop: 437 - Rank min: 80 - Author rank: 230

 
#vim #emacs #codeblocks #c #netbeans #visualstudio

A vim user's story


=== PREFACE

There is lot to say about this and I'm not going to dig deeply into it. I want to say some words about the two most versatile editors/development-environments I have ever seen.

There's no big deal, but why would I prefer a huge, slow and maybe bloated IDE when all I need is just a te.. ahem, buffer editor?

=== IDEs VS EDITORS

To be precise: IDEs are not bad software. But they are very often too much for a user to eventually even considering learning all of the features, and Visual Studio makes no exception: though being quite user-friendly, almost perfect for a developer, and having a nice documentation, it lacks of readiness, speed, and very often intuitiveness when it comes to environment settings. On the other side, Code::Blocks is not very friendly and maybe quite ugly and old-looking, but it really does everything one would need: it has the best GDB integration I have ever seen, though it could do better with GUI design (where Visual Studio just dominates with its Blend) and customization. NetBeans instead is kind of an in-between. It's very nice, though it suffers from being based on Java (which isn't really an issue itself, but may lead to issue) and being somewhat unresponsive sometimes with packages and customizations (at least I noticed that there is something wrong loading custom themes and packages) which may be unpleasant when you realize the reason your project doesn't compile because of some weird java exceptions (uncommon, but happened).

=== GUI VS UX

Although the history told us mice are more user-friendly, there's to say that the fact that it is useful is a misconception. The reason is that we as #programmers just don't use it when programming. Well, unless for copy-pasting StackOverflow answers (nope really), which is anyway a bad practice. We should #RTFM, as they always say. And it's true. The reason is simple: the keyboard is immediate and the mouse needs first pointing then clicking. That's slower for us. We don't need to click on a green triangle button to run the app, we should CTRL+F5.

=== (Dis)Advantages of Text Editors

Obviously, I'll not consider notepad.exe. It's just wrong for programming. I'll compare Notepad++ with, say, Atom and Sublime. Let's start with Notepad++. It's kinda basic and looks wrong/ugly. It actually can do lots of things and could be compared to something like UEStudio: it just has everything... except speed. The issue with Notepad++ is that it is awesome as it is: filling it up with plugins will slow it down very easily. Though, it is nice because it has debugger integration (using plugins; could be better but works), file map, code folding, nice theming features (just for the editor though), folder browsing, FTP support (plugins), etc. I think you're getting the main idea: it is light and nice but man he needs to fed up to be nicer. And often it costs very much (from glitches due to unsupported postscript fonts to slowness), as it gets heavier... and heavier... and basically defeats its original purpose of being a text editor (its defaults actually do a lot more, like macroes, python scripting - though buggy, autocompletion - though dictionary-based, ...). Let's check Atom/Brackets. It's actually a bit bett... no. It's just ok. 6/10. Actually, 6-. That minus stands for "hell why". The reason is this: it has a quite nice GUI and generally I like the Squirrel system. But, to achieve this result, it went to the "dark side" and everything is bound to NodeJS. It wouldn't be a problem if it was just for the API/extensions. But they based Electron on Node, which means it's not a very fast environment.

Damn it, I say, why? Why do I need WPF or Node/Webkit to draw beautiful GUIs? Why is GTK+/CSS so painful?!

Well, that's where Sublime wins. If I'm not wrong, most of it was written in C++ and Python. It is anyway an in-between. It's extensible yeah, customizable and... "light" (actually mid, but still) ...and shareware. Damn it. It would have been perfect.

=== The Terminal VS The Window(s)

My ideal post would be a large desk with three monitors: code to the left, debugger/web-inspector on the right and the product on the center of the screen. Though, when reading code, our eyes actually scroll top to bottom and not left to right. That's just the way you write programs.

It would be nice as well to have anything working like that. We should not have "an IDE" that emulates what we already have. In fact, though simpler to install/use, IDEs often come with a bunchful of apps and libs or even custom building tools (nuget, tdm gcc, ...) that we would probably never use or even have the time to learn/configure. We just want our program to build & run. The best IDE is your own Operating System. Every operating system comes with a nice documentation with APIs (99% of the times in C) and tools we often don't really know about because they're hidden by the GUI. That's why the Terminal exists. It allows you to directly input the instructions. Wouldn't it be just faster to use them without installing 2GB of apps that so it for us?

On Windows you actually just need a C compiler to program for Windows in C and not the entire Visual Studio.

On GNU/Linux, you actually don't even have to install a compiler because 99% is already there.

So, I can create my C app with a text editor, then execute the commands. Both are the lightest and simplest steps to take. It is almost as simple as:
$ gcc hello.c -o hello
$ ./hello

Now, you might wonder how is that faster than clicking a button. The answer is: IDEs usually use their project management system to efficiently edit files and may bloat the source tree by adding efficient way to handle big projects (for example Code::Blocks sets up a Makefile). But, do we really need a Makefile or a complex project manager?

As a C programmer, I'm pretty sure I need two things: an algorithm and an editor to write the program that follows it.

This means that if I don't care about GUI (in which case light solutions like Glade do exist) I don't just need any of that bloatware.

I just need a text editor. Maybe with autocompletions to be faster, maybe with an integrated cli for running programs, maybe with macroes... but it has to be the faster medium between me and the terminal.

=== VIM

There are two widely known editors in this field that always are recommended: Vim and Emacs.

Before trying them I was a Windows user and mostly programmed with VS, Atom or Notepad++ (Notepadqq, Mouspad and Kate on GNU/Linux) so I was not getting why CTRL+S did not work on those editors as I expectes. Also I did not get why were those "weird" keybindings considered useful. Now have much more experience and I know where I was wrong: it was not a bad thing to program with GUI apps, but it was time-consuming, more than needed.

So I started to learn VIM and finally I got why I couldn't even insert text into the file buffer. Working with VIM I realized how simple it was to configure my environment efficiently: small programs, fast .vimrc edits the way I like it, even cli commands using a simple keys combination. I hated emacs. Oh, if I did. I hated it because I had found it very confusing, much more than vim did: how can a cli text editor occupy like 500MB ?! So I continued my vim way and customized themes, fonts, learnt commands and installed plugins... then I realized something.

I was turning a text editor into an IDE. I found myself searching google for "how to debug C program from inside vim" when I could really just :! gdb without issues.

The problem is that programmers are both lazy and crazy.

I mean, you can't feed up vim/neovim with plugins because it gets slow (in particular with python) and it's also not a very nice option when dealing with big projects (no, NERDTree doesn't help here).

But... how can I satisfy both laziness and craziness?!

You actually can.

=== GNU/EMACS

HEH.

There's much to be said. I could summarize it this way: EMACS is surely less responsive than VIM but hell if it works good. I was too lazy to read the tutorial, that's why I hated it! Now that I know how emacs works I feel like I can do anything. Its LISP environment is awesome, its plugins are awesome, its keybidnings are intuitive and not as painful as I thought (still I think I can do better with VIM, even if EMACS's windows management is just better) and also, I would have never thought it's so easy to manage.

I did this setup, which works both in the gui and the tty/terminal, in like 10 minutes:




Though being so nice, I admit that there's a problem related to the way it's designed: it only makes sense in a GNU environment. It just doesn't on Windows, and the reason is that it is designed to be the total commander of GNU: everything under control, everything ready to be used.

I'm not surprised anymore some poeple wants to run it as pid 0 on GNU/Linux systems.

Also it has the best documentation I have ever seen.

=== Conclusion

Emacs is just perfect, but I think VIM fits best for fast edits and small projects.

I can be way very efficient now that I'm aware of the power of the GNU.

 
#vim #emacs #codeblocks #c #netbeans #visualstudio

A vim user's story


=== PREFACE

There is lot to say about this and I'm not going to dig deeply into it. I want to say some words about the two most versatile editors/development-environments I have ever seen.

There's no big deal, but why would I prefer a huge, slow and maybe bloated IDE when all I need is just a te.. ahem, buffer editor?

=== IDEs VS EDITORS

To be precise: IDEs are not bad software. But they are very often too much for a user to eventually even considering learning all of the features, and Visual Studio makes no exception: though being quite user-friendly, almost perfect for a developer, and having a nice documentation, it lacks of readiness, speed, and very often intuitiveness when it comes to environment settings. On the other side, Code::Blocks is not very friendly and maybe quite ugly and old-looking, but it really does everything one would need: it has the best GDB integration I have ever seen, though it could do better with GUI design (where Visual Studio just dominates with its Blend) and customization. NetBeans instead is kind of an in-between. It's very nice, though it suffers from being based on Java (which isn't really an issue itself, but may lead to issue) and being somewhat unresponsive sometimes with packages and customizations (at least I noticed that there is something wrong loading custom themes and packages) which may be unpleasant when you realize the reason your project doesn't compile because of some weird java exceptions (uncommon, but happened).

=== GUI VS UX

Although the history told us mice are more user-friendly, there's to say that the fact that it is useful is a misconception. The reason is that we as #programmers just don't use it when programming. Well, unless for copy-pasting StackOverflow answers (nope really), which is anyway a bad practice. We should #RTFM, as they always say. And it's true. The reason is simple: the keyboard is immediate and the mouse needs first pointing then clicking. That's slower for us. We don't need to click on a green triangle button to run the app, we should CTRL+F5.

=== (Dis)Advantages of Text Editors

Obviously, I'll not consider notepad.exe. It's just wrong for programming. I'll compare Notepad++ with, say, Atom and Sublime. Let's start with Notepad++. It's kinda basic and looks wrong/ugly. It actually can do lots of things and could be compared to something like UEStudio: it just has everything... except speed. The issue with Notepad++ is that it is awesome as it is: filling it up with plugins will slow it down very easily. Though, it is nice because it has debugger integration (using plugins; could be better but works), file map, code folding, nice theming features (just for the editor though), folder browsing, FTP support (plugins), etc. I think you're getting the main idea: it is light and nice but man he needs to fed up to be nicer. And often it costs very much (from glitches due to unsupported postscript fonts to slowness), as it gets heavier... and heavier... and basically defeats its original purpose of being a text editor (its defaults actually do a lot more, like macroes, python scripting - though buggy, autocompletion - though dictionary-based, ...). Let's check Atom/Brackets. It's actually a bit bett... no. It's just ok. 6/10. Actually, 6-. That minus stands for "hell why". The reason is this: it has a quite nice GUI and generally I like the Squirrel system. But, to achieve this result, it went to the "dark side" and everything is bound to NodeJS. It wouldn't be a problem if it was just for the API/extensions. But they based Electron on Node, which means it's not a very fast environment.

Damn it, I say, why? Why do I need WPF or Node/Webkit to draw beautiful GUIs? Why is GTK+/CSS so painful?!

Well, that's where Sublime wins. If I'm not wrong, most of it was written in C++ and Python. It is anyway an in-between. It's extensible yeah, customizable and... "light" (actually mid, but still) ...and shareware. Damn it. It would have been perfect.

=== The Terminal VS The Window(s)

My ideal post would be a large desk with three monitors: code to the left, debugger/web-inspector on the right and the product on the center of the screen. Though, when reading code, our eyes actually scroll top to bottom and not left to right. That's just the way you write programs.

It would be nice as well to have anything working like that. We should not have "an IDE" that emulates what we already have. In fact, though simpler to install/use, IDEs often come with a bunchful of apps and libs or even custom building tools (nuget, tdm gcc, ...) that we would probably never use or even have the time to learn/configure. We just want our program to build & run. The best IDE is your own Operating System. Every operating system comes with a nice documentation with APIs (99% of the times in C) and tools we often don't really know about because they're hidden by the GUI. That's why the Terminal exists. It allows you to directly input the instructions. Wouldn't it be just faster to use them without installing 2GB of apps that so it for us?

On Windows you actually just need a C compiler to program for Windows in C and not the entire Visual Studio.

On GNU/Linux, you actually don't even have to install a compiler because 99% is already there.

So, I can create my C app with a text editor, then execute the commands. Both are the lightest and simplest steps to take. It is almost as simple as:
$ gcc hello.c -o hello
$ ./hello

Now, you might wonder how is that faster than clicking a button. The answer is: IDEs usually use their project management system to efficiently edit files and may bloat the source tree by adding efficient way to handle big projects (for example Code::Blocks sets up a Makefile). But, do we really need a Makefile or a complex project manager?

As a C programmer, I'm pretty sure I need two things: an algorithm and an editor to write the program that follows it.

This means that if I don't care about GUI (in which case light solutions like Glade do exist) I don't just need any of that bloatware.

I just need a text editor. Maybe with autocompletions to be faster, maybe with an integrated cli for running programs, maybe with macroes... but it has to be the faster medium between me and the terminal.

=== VIM

There are two widely known editors in this field that always are recommended: Vim and Emacs.

Before trying them I was a Windows user and mostly programmed with VS, Atom or Notepad++ (Notepadqq, Mouspad and Kate on GNU/Linux) so I was not getting why CTRL+S did not work on those editors as I expectes. Also I did not get why were those "weird" keybindings considered useful. Now have much more experience and I know where I was wrong: it was not a bad thing to program with GUI apps, but it was time-consuming, more than needed.

So I started to learn VIM and finally I got why I couldn't even insert text into the file buffer. Working with VIM I realized how simple it was to configure my environment efficiently: small programs, fast .vimrc edits the way I like it, even cli commands using a simple keys combination. I hated emacs. Oh, if I did. I hated it because I had found it very confusing, much more than vim did: how can a cli text editor occupy like 500MB ?! So I continued my vim way and customized themes, fonts, learnt commands and installed plugins... then I realized something.

I was turning a text editor into an IDE. I found myself searching google for "how to debug C program from inside vim" when I could really just :! gdb without issues.

The problem is that programmers are both lazy and crazy.

I mean, you can't feed up vim/neovim with plugins because it gets slow (in particular with python) and it's also not a very nice option when dealing with big projects (no, NERDTree doesn't help here).

But... how can I satisfy both laziness and craziness?!

You actually can.

=== GNU/EMACS

HEH.

There's much to be said. I could summarize it this way: EMACS is surely less responsive than VIM but hell if it works good. I was too lazy to read the tutorial, that's why I hated it! Now that I know how emacs works I feel like I can do anything. Its LISP environment is awesome, its plugins are awesome, its keybidnings are intuitive and not as painful as I thought (still I think I can do better with VIM, even if EMACS's windows management is just better) and also, I would have never thought it's so easy to manage.

I did this setup, which works both in the gui and the tty/terminal, in like 10 minutes:




Though being so nice, I admit that there's a problem related to the way it's designed: it only makes sense in a GNU environment. It just doesn't on Windows, and the reason is that it is designed to be the total commander of GNU: everything under control, everything ready to be used.

I'm not surprised anymore some poeple wants to run it as pid 0 on GNU/Linux systems.

Also it has the best documentation I have ever seen.

=== Conclusion

Emacs is just perfect, but I think VIM fits best for fast edits and small projects.

I can be way very efficient now that I'm aware of the power of the GNU.

 
Immagine/foto

She finally got her #emacs set up the way she likes it:

 
3 #Emacs modes for taking notes
https://opensource.com/article/18/7/emacs-modes-note-taking #gnu #freesw

 
3 #Emacs modes for taking notes
https://opensource.com/article/18/7/emacs-modes-note-taking #gnu #freesw

 



skeeto/elfeed: An Emacs web feeds clienthttps://github.com/skeeto/elfeed

Elfeed is an extensible web feed reader for Emacs, supporting both Atom and RSS. It requires Emacs 24.3 and is available for download from MELPA or el-get. Elfeed was inspired by notmuch.

#emacs #rss

skeeto/elfeed

elfeed - An Emacs web feeds client

 
After having seen the videos and Emacs Org-mode - a system for note-taking and project planning, I'm seriously thinking about switching from Freeplane (a mind mapping tool) and Vim for taking notes and writing. #emacs #notetaking #orgmode #freesw #writing

YouTube: Emacs Org-mode - a system for note-taking and project planning (GoogleTechTalks)

Google Tech Talks July 15, 2008 ABSTRACT Org-mode is a large Emacs sub-systems that has been integrated into Emacs with the version 22.1 release. From it ori...

 
After having seen the videos and Emacs Org-mode - a system for note-taking and project planning, I'm seriously thinking about switching from Freeplane (a mind mapping tool) and Vim for taking notes and writing. #emacs #notetaking #orgmode #freesw #writing

YouTube: Emacs Org-mode - a system for note-taking and project planning (GoogleTechTalks)

Google Tech Talks July 15, 2008 ABSTRACT Org-mode is a large Emacs sub-systems that has been integrated into Emacs with the version 22.1 release. From it ori...

 
Gestión de paquetes en Emacs: ELPA, MELPA, MARMELADE

Pues sí, Emacs también tiene su gestión de paquetes, y aunque ya habíamos visto algo de el en este post al instalar la nueva versión de org-mode - por cierto ya es la 9.01 cómo se puede ver en su página -, he tenido que verlo un poco por un ajuste de mi equipo. Todo comenzó al intentar ajustar mi tema a un fondos oscuro, que veo mejor, y encontrarme que los temas por defecto tienes un color de fuentes demasiado suaves par mi vista. Buscando por Internet encontré este tema Dark Mint Theme que parece ajustarse a lo que mejor me va y resulta se instala desde MELPA, así que vamos con ello.

\#emacs
Originally posted at: http://quijotelibre.com/gestion-de-paquetes-en-emacs-elpa-melpa-marmelade/
Gestión de paquetes en Emacs: ELPA, MELPA, MARMELADE

Quijote Libre: Gestión de paquetes en Emacs: ELPA, MELPA, MARMELADE (Quijote Libre)

#/ #emacs #

 
Gestión de paquetes en Emacs: ELPA, MELPA, MARMELADE

Pues sí, Emacs también tiene su gestión de paquetes, y aunque ya habíamos visto algo de el en este post al instalar la nueva versión de org-mode - por cierto ya es la 9.01 cómo se puede ver en su página -, he tenido que verlo un poco por un ajuste de mi equipo. Todo comenzó al intentar ajustar mi tema a un fondos oscuro, que veo mejor, y encontrarme que los temas por defecto tienes un color de fuentes demasiado suaves par mi vista. Buscando por Internet encontré este tema Dark Mint Theme que parece ajustarse a lo que mejor me va y resulta se instala desde MELPA, así que vamos con ello.

\#emacs
Originally posted at: http://quijotelibre.com/gestion-de-paquetes-en-emacs-elpa-melpa-marmelade/
Gestión de paquetes en Emacs: ELPA, MELPA, MARMELADE

Quijote Libre: Gestión de paquetes en Emacs: ELPA, MELPA, MARMELADE (Quijote Libre)

#/ #emacs #

 
Lo que he aprendido: recuperar archivos en Emacs | Onda Hostilhttps://ondahostil.wordpress.com/2016/11/16/lo-que-he-aprendido-recuperar-archivos-en-emacs/

truco rápido de Emacs: cómo se recuperan los archivos cuando Emacs muere.

#emacs #ñ #tutorial

 
Traducir archivos .po con emacs | Bad Daemonshttps://daemons.cf/posts/traducir-archivos-po-con-emacs/

En melpa tenemos el paquete po-mode. Lo instalamos y configuramos del siguiente modo:

#Emacs #gnu #ñ

Traducir archivos .po con emacs | Bad Daemons

#Emacs #gnu #ñ

 
Por qué uso Emacs | Onda Hostilhttps://ondahostil.wordpress.com/2016/11/08/por-que-uso-emacs/

Ahí van mis razones para usar un editor que así de primeras parece anticuado y raruno.

#Emacs #gnu #ñ

Onda Hostil: Por qué uso Emacs (Ondiz)

Muchas veces me preguntan por qué uso Emacs, teniendo en cuenta que soy ingeniera industrial (o de la carrera de la piedra y el palo como la llamo yo) no debería aportar mucho a mi trabajo. La verd…
#Emacs #gnu #ñ

 
Immagine/foto

Curso sobre el manejo del editor Emacs | victorhckinthefreeworldhttps://victorhckinthefreeworld.wordpress.com/2016/11/04/curso-sobre-el-manejo-del-editor-emacs/

#Emacs #gnu #ñ

victorhckinthefreeworld: Curso sobre el manejo del editor Emacs (victorhck)

¿Quieres aprender un poco más sobre el manejo del editor Emacs? Echa un vistazo a este curso en español. Emacs es mucho más que “un editor extensible, personalizable, auto-documentado y de ti…
#Emacs #gnu #ñ

 
Immagine/foto

An Emacs Update – Moved by Freedom – Powered by Standardshttp://standardsandfreedom.net/index.php/2016/10/09/an-emacs-update/

#Emacs

An Emacs Update

It’s been a while I have not written about Emacs and more particularly my personal use case for Emacs. I started using Emacs because I was looking for a text editor capable of handling format…