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Elementi taggati con: Article13


 
Wir wollen uns nicht filtern lassen. Wir fordern die Abgeordneten des Europaparlamentes auf, die EU-Urheberrechtsreform in der jetzigen Fassung abzulehnen! Demo in #Berlin am 2. März https://berlingegen13.wordpress.com/ #uploadfilter #article13

 
Wir wollen uns nicht filtern lassen. Wir fordern die Abgeordneten des Europaparlamentes auf, die EU-Urheberrechtsreform in der jetzigen Fassung abzulehnen! Demo in #Berlin am 2. März https://berlingegen13.wordpress.com/ #uploadfilter #article13

 
Just wrote a letter to Members of European Parliament from six countries asking them to reject Article 13. Two of them host my projects and I just like other four. I honestly believe things like Copyright Directive have global impact no matter where you live. You can write your own letter.

It is a bit too long and certainly not perfect.
Subj: Concerning Copyright Reform and Article 13

Dear Member of the European Parliament!

To make things clear from the start - I am not one of your constituents as I live in Russia. However recent developments concerning Article 13 of the copyright Directive will have global impact which will also directly affect me so I decided to reach out.

You are probably aware of the critique of Article 13. While these proposals might be acceptable to large platforms they will decimate smaller social services because the cost of implementing upload filters will be prohibitive. Also these technologies will have to be outsourced to existing Big Data giants (mostly US based corporations) which will not just raise costs but also affect independence of social services forced to use them.

But I am pretty sure you are already aware of all that.

What I am more worried about is the precedent EU is about to create. Let me be frank - these days EU is beacon of progress and humanitarian rights. When it comes to freedom, privacy, social rights the world looks at you. Article 13 goes against these values. If it gets implemented governments of the rest of the world will see it as a green light to follow with even harder censorship and other restrictions of freedom of speech and expression. And they will already have the technology pioneered by Article 13 compliance - which won't be working good, which will misfire, which will be expensive and most likely under control of corporations like Google and Facebook. And as recent history of my country shows - if there is a restrictive control tool in place, it will be misused at one point or another.

Also there will be economic consequences for European IT companies. Right now a lot of projects are hosted in EU because of legal stability and respect of human rights Europe provides. With Article 13 in place it will change and these projects will move out to minimize potential liability. I am hosting two Internet projects in EU space myself, one in Germany and one in Italy. Please think what makes European hosting companies different from the rest. Also consider the fact that currently there is very little pirated material openly hosted by them - EU companies are known for low tolerance for piracy.

Please consider the overwhelming amount of critique towards Article 13. A good selection of points is here: https://saveyourinternet.eu/statements/

As a part of World Wide Web community I ask you to reject Article 13 of the copyright Directive.

Sincerely Yours,
Alexander
#article13 #EU #copyrightreform #CensorshipMachine #SaveYourInternet #digitalresistance #copyright #privacy #freedom #activism
Breaking: The text of Article 13 and the EU Copyright Directive has just been finalised

 

European Copyright Reform: Article 13 puts alternative social networks at risk


If you live in the European Union, you have probably heard about the planned European Copyright Reform, and you are probably aware of its controversial Article 13.

The so-called Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market intends to introduce new regulations around copyright. Article 13 would add new liability rules for online content-sharing service providers. While previously, providers could act on content that infringed copyright upon receiving a notice, the proposed regulations would render providers accountable for content as soon as it has been uploaded.

Effectively, this would put providers into a position where they have to implement strict upload filters to prevent users from uploading content that may infringe on someone else's copyright. This is dangerous, and it puts free speech, the diversity of opinions, and the internet as a whole at risk.

Article 13 previously contained rules to exclude platforms younger than three years, generating revenue of less than €10 million or with fewer than 5 million active users. Last week, however, a new draft was published, and the proposal now only excludes platforms matching all three of those conditions.

This is shocking. If Article 13 became a reality, everyone who operates a platform for users to publish content for more than three years would be 100% liable for everything happening on that platform, including content the operators are not even aware of. This makes operating an alternative social network effectively impossible.

For more details about the planned copyright reform, and information on how you can help, please check out saveyourinternet.eu. This does not concern just diaspora\* or your other favorite alternative social network. This concerns everyone. This is about health of the internet. Please #SaveYourInternet and fight against the #CensorshipMachine.

For reference, you will find below an open letter from diappora\* core team member Dennis Schubert, sent to those members of the European Parliament who currently support Article 13.
Dear Member of the European Parliament

The proposed Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market has been the topic of discussions for many months now. In spite of many debates on this matter, not much progress has been made to address concerns of many respected experts, including many NGOs and even the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye[1]. According to my information, you are in the group of members of the European Parliament currently in favour of supporting this proposal, which is why I am reaching out to you to request you to reconsider the proposal, and especially consider the impact Article 13 will have on the Internet.

I am writing to you as a citizen of the European Union, but I am also reaching out to represent the many users and engineers behind alternative social networks. I am the project lead of diaspora*[2], an alternative, distributed social network based on free and open-source software. Together with similar projects such as Mastodon and Friendica, the world of alternative social media reaches over 2.5 million users on more than 4000 servers, including citizens who are part of your constituency.

Until now, the European Union has been seen as the epicentre of many efforts to build and maintain alternatives to large networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many of these projects, their developers, and users are citizens of the European Union, and our projects enjoy great popularity among people as they are seen as privacy-friendly, local alternatives to the large systems built by American corporations. On many occasions in the past, European Union legislation has supported these projects and their principles, for instance with the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation [4]to ensure high levels of data privacy for EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the planned copyright reform, and especially Article 13, will have an effect exactly opposite to supporting such projects and efforts.

The upload filters both explicitly described in and implied by the text on which you will be voting would force all online platforms to rely on technologies known to be error-prone, intrusive and legally questionable[5]. The proposal intends to hold providers of online platforms accountable for all content uploaded by users as soon as they have been published, contrary to the "notice and takedown" procedure currently in place, which allows providers to remove offending content upon receiving notice without the fear of legal repercussions.

For large platforms like Twitter and YouTube, this change would result in the implementation of stricter upload filters. Due to the technical natures of such systems and the strict liability regulations, those systems will be designed to block "too much", because blocking "too little" would put the provider at risk. Such over-cautious filters are a danger for users' freedom of speech, the diversity of opinions and creativity on the entire Internet, and would limit EU citizens' rights substantially.

Implementing Article 13 in its current form would be the end for smaller platforms and projects, as well as small and medium-sized businesses working on these or similar projects. Although in a previous revision of the proposal, platforms younger than three years, with revenue of less than €10 million, or with fewer than 5 million monthly active users would be excluded, a recent revision of the proposal now only excludes projects that meet all three of these conditions. For projects like diaspora*, which is significantly older than three years, this decision would result in all operators being responsible for every action their users do.

Non-profit projects like diaspora* are developed and maintained by people working voluntarily. Operators of servers running these software projects run those because they deem privacy important and want to provide an alternative to the large networks. They do not earn any money by doing this. The development, embedding and maintenance of infrastructure needed to filter copyright violations automatically requires a lot of resources, and implementing such solutions would thus simply be impossible.

If Article 13 became a reality, these projects and companies would not be able to comply with the new laws, so they could either cease to provide their services to European citizens and move their operations to a country outside the EU or stop their activities altogether. For Europe, especially as a community for strong privacy principles and independent, alternative solutions, this would be a huge step backwards and would make the established large networks, which quite regularly violate European principles, even more powerful.

With this, I am asking you to reject Article 13 of the Copyright Directive and to support all citizens who raise their voice for a free, open and diverse Internet.

Please do not use your vote to destroy the Internet.

Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Dennis Schubert

[1]: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Opinion/Legislation/OL-OTH-41-2018.pdf
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspora_(software)
[3]: https://the-federation.info/
[4]: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:02016R0679-20160504
[5]: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/571681753c44d835a440c8b5/t/58d058712994ca536bbfa47a/1490049138881/FilteringPaperWebsite.pdf

Standalone Open letter, English Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-en.html
Standalone Open letter, German Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-de.html
#diaspora #privacy #copyright #europe #article13
Home

 

European Copyright Reform: Article 13 puts alternative social networks at risk


If you live in the European Union, you have probably heard about the planned European Copyright Reform, and you are probably aware of its controversial Article 13.

The so-called Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market intends to introduce new regulations around copyright. Article 13 would add new liability rules for online content-sharing service providers. While previously, providers could act on content that infringed copyright upon receiving a notice, the proposed regulations would render providers accountable for content as soon as it has been uploaded.

Effectively, this would put providers into a position where they have to implement strict upload filters to prevent users from uploading content that may infringe on someone else's copyright. This is dangerous, and it puts free speech, the diversity of opinions, and the internet as a whole at risk.

Article 13 previously contained rules to exclude platforms younger than three years, generating revenue of less than €10 million or with fewer than 5 million active users. Last week, however, a new draft was published, and the proposal now only excludes platforms matching all three of those conditions.

This is shocking. If Article 13 became a reality, everyone who operates a platform for users to publish content for more than three years would be 100% liable for everything happening on that platform, including content the operators are not even aware of. This makes operating an alternative social network effectively impossible.

For more details about the planned copyright reform, and information on how you can help, please check out saveyourinternet.eu. This does not concern just diaspora\* or your other favorite alternative social network. This concerns everyone. This is about health of the internet. Please #SaveYourInternet and fight against the #CensorshipMachine.

For reference, you will find below an open letter from diappora\* core team member Dennis Schubert, sent to those members of the European Parliament who currently support Article 13.
Dear Member of the European Parliament

The proposed Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market has been the topic of discussions for many months now. In spite of many debates on this matter, not much progress has been made to address concerns of many respected experts, including many NGOs and even the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye[1]. According to my information, you are in the group of members of the European Parliament currently in favour of supporting this proposal, which is why I am reaching out to you to request you to reconsider the proposal, and especially consider the impact Article 13 will have on the Internet.

I am writing to you as a citizen of the European Union, but I am also reaching out to represent the many users and engineers behind alternative social networks. I am the project lead of diaspora*[2], an alternative, distributed social network based on free and open-source software. Together with similar projects such as Mastodon and Friendica, the world of alternative social media reaches over 2.5 million users on more than 4000 servers, including citizens who are part of your constituency.

Until now, the European Union has been seen as the epicentre of many efforts to build and maintain alternatives to large networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many of these projects, their developers, and users are citizens of the European Union, and our projects enjoy great popularity among people as they are seen as privacy-friendly, local alternatives to the large systems built by American corporations. On many occasions in the past, European Union legislation has supported these projects and their principles, for instance with the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation [4]to ensure high levels of data privacy for EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the planned copyright reform, and especially Article 13, will have an effect exactly opposite to supporting such projects and efforts.

The upload filters both explicitly described in and implied by the text on which you will be voting would force all online platforms to rely on technologies known to be error-prone, intrusive and legally questionable[5]. The proposal intends to hold providers of online platforms accountable for all content uploaded by users as soon as they have been published, contrary to the "notice and takedown" procedure currently in place, which allows providers to remove offending content upon receiving notice without the fear of legal repercussions.

For large platforms like Twitter and YouTube, this change would result in the implementation of stricter upload filters. Due to the technical natures of such systems and the strict liability regulations, those systems will be designed to block "too much", because blocking "too little" would put the provider at risk. Such over-cautious filters are a danger for users' freedom of speech, the diversity of opinions and creativity on the entire Internet, and would limit EU citizens' rights substantially.

Implementing Article 13 in its current form would be the end for smaller platforms and projects, as well as small and medium-sized businesses working on these or similar projects. Although in a previous revision of the proposal, platforms younger than three years, with revenue of less than €10 million, or with fewer than 5 million monthly active users would be excluded, a recent revision of the proposal now only excludes projects that meet all three of these conditions. For projects like diaspora*, which is significantly older than three years, this decision would result in all operators being responsible for every action their users do.

Non-profit projects like diaspora* are developed and maintained by people working voluntarily. Operators of servers running these software projects run those because they deem privacy important and want to provide an alternative to the large networks. They do not earn any money by doing this. The development, embedding and maintenance of infrastructure needed to filter copyright violations automatically requires a lot of resources, and implementing such solutions would thus simply be impossible.

If Article 13 became a reality, these projects and companies would not be able to comply with the new laws, so they could either cease to provide their services to European citizens and move their operations to a country outside the EU or stop their activities altogether. For Europe, especially as a community for strong privacy principles and independent, alternative solutions, this would be a huge step backwards and would make the established large networks, which quite regularly violate European principles, even more powerful.

With this, I am asking you to reject Article 13 of the Copyright Directive and to support all citizens who raise their voice for a free, open and diverse Internet.

Please do not use your vote to destroy the Internet.

Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Dennis Schubert

[1]: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Opinion/Legislation/OL-OTH-41-2018.pdf
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspora_(software)
[3]: https://the-federation.info/
[4]: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:02016R0679-20160504
[5]: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/571681753c44d835a440c8b5/t/58d058712994ca536bbfa47a/1490049138881/FilteringPaperWebsite.pdf

Standalone Open letter, English Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-en.html
Standalone Open letter, German Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-de.html
#diaspora #privacy #copyright #europe #article13
Home

 

European Copyright Reform: Article 13 puts alternative social networks at risk


If you live in the European Union, you have probably heard about the planned European Copyright Reform, and you are probably aware of its controversial Article 13.

The so-called Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market intends to introduce new regulations around copyright. Article 13 would add new liability rules for online content-sharing service providers. While previously, providers could act on content that infringed copyright upon receiving a notice, the proposed regulations would render providers accountable for content as soon as it has been uploaded.

Effectively, this would put providers into a position where they have to implement strict upload filters to prevent users from uploading content that may infringe on someone else's copyright. This is dangerous, and it puts free speech, the diversity of opinions, and the internet as a whole at risk.

Article 13 previously contained rules to exclude platforms younger than three years, generating revenue of less than €10 million or with fewer than 5 million active users. Last week, however, a new draft was published, and the proposal now only excludes platforms matching all three of those conditions.

This is shocking. If Article 13 became a reality, everyone who operates a platform for users to publish content for more than three years would be 100% liable for everything happening on that platform, including content the operators are not even aware of. This makes operating an alternative social network effectively impossible.

For more details about the planned copyright reform, and information on how you can help, please check out saveyourinternet.eu. This does not concern just diaspora\* or your other favorite alternative social network. This concerns everyone. This is about health of the internet. Please #SaveYourInternet and fight against the #CensorshipMachine.

For reference, you will find below an open letter from diappora\* core team member Dennis Schubert, sent to those members of the European Parliament who currently support Article 13.
Dear Member of the European Parliament

The proposed Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market has been the topic of discussions for many months now. In spite of many debates on this matter, not much progress has been made to address concerns of many respected experts, including many NGOs and even the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye[1]. According to my information, you are in the group of members of the European Parliament currently in favour of supporting this proposal, which is why I am reaching out to you to request you to reconsider the proposal, and especially consider the impact Article 13 will have on the Internet.

I am writing to you as a citizen of the European Union, but I am also reaching out to represent the many users and engineers behind alternative social networks. I am the project lead of diaspora*[2], an alternative, distributed social network based on free and open-source software. Together with similar projects such as Mastodon and Friendica, the world of alternative social media reaches over 2.5 million users on more than 4000 servers, including citizens who are part of your constituency.

Until now, the European Union has been seen as the epicentre of many efforts to build and maintain alternatives to large networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many of these projects, their developers, and users are citizens of the European Union, and our projects enjoy great popularity among people as they are seen as privacy-friendly, local alternatives to the large systems built by American corporations. On many occasions in the past, European Union legislation has supported these projects and their principles, for instance with the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation [4]to ensure high levels of data privacy for EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the planned copyright reform, and especially Article 13, will have an effect exactly opposite to supporting such projects and efforts.

The upload filters both explicitly described in and implied by the text on which you will be voting would force all online platforms to rely on technologies known to be error-prone, intrusive and legally questionable[5]. The proposal intends to hold providers of online platforms accountable for all content uploaded by users as soon as they have been published, contrary to the "notice and takedown" procedure currently in place, which allows providers to remove offending content upon receiving notice without the fear of legal repercussions.

For large platforms like Twitter and YouTube, this change would result in the implementation of stricter upload filters. Due to the technical natures of such systems and the strict liability regulations, those systems will be designed to block "too much", because blocking "too little" would put the provider at risk. Such over-cautious filters are a danger for users' freedom of speech, the diversity of opinions and creativity on the entire Internet, and would limit EU citizens' rights substantially.

Implementing Article 13 in its current form would be the end for smaller platforms and projects, as well as small and medium-sized businesses working on these or similar projects. Although in a previous revision of the proposal, platforms younger than three years, with revenue of less than €10 million, or with fewer than 5 million monthly active users would be excluded, a recent revision of the proposal now only excludes projects that meet all three of these conditions. For projects like diaspora*, which is significantly older than three years, this decision would result in all operators being responsible for every action their users do.

Non-profit projects like diaspora* are developed and maintained by people working voluntarily. Operators of servers running these software projects run those because they deem privacy important and want to provide an alternative to the large networks. They do not earn any money by doing this. The development, embedding and maintenance of infrastructure needed to filter copyright violations automatically requires a lot of resources, and implementing such solutions would thus simply be impossible.

If Article 13 became a reality, these projects and companies would not be able to comply with the new laws, so they could either cease to provide their services to European citizens and move their operations to a country outside the EU or stop their activities altogether. For Europe, especially as a community for strong privacy principles and independent, alternative solutions, this would be a huge step backwards and would make the established large networks, which quite regularly violate European principles, even more powerful.

With this, I am asking you to reject Article 13 of the Copyright Directive and to support all citizens who raise their voice for a free, open and diverse Internet.

Please do not use your vote to destroy the Internet.

Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Dennis Schubert

[1]: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Opinion/Legislation/OL-OTH-41-2018.pdf
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspora_(software)
[3]: https://the-federation.info/
[4]: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:02016R0679-20160504
[5]: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/571681753c44d835a440c8b5/t/58d058712994ca536bbfa47a/1490049138881/FilteringPaperWebsite.pdf

Standalone Open letter, English Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-en.html
Standalone Open letter, German Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-de.html
#diaspora #privacy #copyright #europe #article13
Home

 
alabamablacksnake@diaspora.dev.facil.services
Umm, Wikileaks? blocked by hosts, paypal,visa, Some US government employes are banned from visitation. And most 0day exploits and “Russian/Chinese hacks” lead back to US or Israeli state santioned hacking when facts and truth come around.
5 minutes ago
Okay maybe.. but fuck #article13 !

 
Immagine/foto
German people do not respect anyone, culture, none. First the Celts destroyed Europe, no need to mention ww.., now they are killing www aka the internet

F U GERMANY ( Europe, yeah right.. ) !


#germany #deutschland #nazi-forever #gdpr #article13

 
Call to Action: Save Free Software this September: https://fsfe.org/news/2018/news-20180905-02.de.html #CopyrightActionWeek #copyrightdirective #Article13


@Gruppo Linux Como

 
Call to Action: Save Free Software this September: https://fsfe.org/news/2018/news-20180905-02.de.html #CopyrightActionWeek #copyrightdirective #Article13

 
Call to Action: Save Free Software this September: https://fsfe.org/news/2018/news-20180905-02.de.html #CopyrightActionWeek #copyrightdirective #Article13

 
Salvar el futuro digital de Europa, asegurándose de que se replantee o suprima el artículo 13 de la reforma de los derechos de autor de la UE.#Article13 #SaveCodeShare

 






On Thurs 5th July, the European Parliament votes on the new Copyright Directive, including #Article11 (the #SnippetTax) and #Article13 (the #CensorshipMachine).

Art13 would mean mandatory YouTube-style content filters on all websites.

Please contact your MEP today and tell them to vote against the new Copyright Directive.

Complete list of MEPs with contact details here:

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/meps/en/map.html

More details on the issues involved here:

https://saveyourinternet.eu/

#SaveYourInternet

 

Diaspora* users in the EU are called upon to ACT NOW.


https://saveyourinternet.eu

CONTACT YOUR MEPs

#saveyourinternet #EU #Internet #CopyrightDirective #FixCopyright #CensorshipMachine #Article13 #Censorship #free-speech #FreeSpeech #Privacy #gnu #CreativeCommons #creative-commons #fair-use #FairUse #orwell #orwellian #diaspora
Home

 

Diaspora* users in the EU are called upon to ACT NOW.


https://saveyourinternet.eu

CONTACT YOUR MEPs

#saveyourinternet #EU #Internet #CopyrightDirective #FixCopyright #CensorshipMachine #Article13 #Censorship #free-speech #FreeSpeech #Privacy #gnu #CreativeCommons #creative-commons #fair-use #FairUse #orwell #orwellian #diaspora
Home

 

Will Article 13 of new EU Copyright Directive Shut Down Diasp.eu and Other Pods in Europe?


Has anyone living in Europe -- especially those running a pod -- any sense of how this will affect us if it's not stopped?

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2017/06/bad-law-not-bad-luck-article-13-new-eu-copyright-directive-requires-general-upload-filters/ <-- untaxed link

#13 #article13 #article-13 #eu #eu-copyright-directive #diaspora
Bad law, not bad luck: Article 13 of new EU Copyright Directive requires general upload filters

 

Will Article 13 of new EU Copyright Directive Shut Down Diasp.eu and Other Pods in Europe?


Has anyone living in Europe -- especially those running a pod -- any sense of how this will affect us if it's not stopped?

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2017/06/bad-law-not-bad-luck-article-13-new-eu-copyright-directive-requires-general-upload-filters/ <-- untaxed link

#13 #article13 #article-13 #eu #eu-copyright-directive #diaspora
Bad law, not bad luck: Article 13 of new EU Copyright Directive requires general upload filters