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@Phreaker
Depends on your os, but typically you can #longpress the icon and then find a way to #deinstall.

Just go ahead. It's not that difficult 💁‍♀️🤙

People will find ways to reach you. Fallback SMS is always possible if better #alternatives are not an option for the others...

 
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto

# Alternatives (mark II) #


Krita drawing - 3508 × 3000 - 6,8 MB PNG - A new and improved version of a drawing I made long time ago. This time made it in colour and added some extra logos. Hubzilla and Mastodon over the little fire and WeChat instead of G+ that will soon close.

There are plenty more projects in the federation and the fediverse and as all the art I publish on this profile is CC-by you can add and rework the image as much as you like. The image is maybe a bit to detailed to make and effective meme, but if any of you can use it to get more people fitted around the fire I would be pleased. In 250dpi it can also be a poster of 35x30 cm...

Made with Krita

Immagine/foto

Immagine/foto




Immagine/foto

Like all other works on this profile this work is licensed under a

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.


Attribute: Katharsisdrill - Link to: https://www.datataffel.dk/u/katharsisdrill



#art #krita #madewithkrita #drawing #alternatives #Diaspora #Friendica #Hubzilla #Mastodon #community #fire #art #drawing #Illustration
#mywork #ownwork #cc #creativecommons #cc-by

 
Immagine/foto
Immagine/foto

# Alternatives (mark II) #


Krita drawing - 3508 × 3000 - 6,8 MB PNG - A new and improved version of a drawing I made long time ago. This time made it in colour and added some extra logos. Hubzilla and Mastodon over the little fire and WeChat instead of G+ that will soon close.

There are plenty more projects in the federation and the fediverse and as all the art I publish on this profile is CC-by you can add and rework the image as much as you like. The image is maybe a bit to detailed to make and effective meme, but if any of you can use it to get more people fitted around the fire I would be pleased. In 250dpi it can also be a poster of 35x30 cm...

Made with Krita

Immagine/foto

Immagine/foto




Immagine/foto

Like all other works on this profile this work is licensed under a

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.


Attribute: Katharsisdrill - Link to: https://www.datataffel.dk/u/katharsisdrill



#art #krita #madewithkrita #drawing #alternatives #Diaspora #Friendica #Hubzilla #Mastodon #community #fire #art #drawing #Illustration
#mywork #ownwork #cc #creativecommons #cc-by

 
Immagine/foto Catweazle
Today it is almost impossible to completely dispense with Google, without having to limit yourself too much in the network.
I dunno ...I've done everything to the left,
and I'm running along just fine.

As far as other alternatives being lesser?

The more people that know-about, use, support and fund the #alternatives, the better that these alternatives will get.

The only other choice is to concede and give up.

And I am not in that camp.

#NotAQuitter

 
Immagine/foto

"Allez viens, on sauve le monde !", mercredi 26 septembre à Mix'art Myrys à #Toulouse


Vous faites quoi le mercredi 26 septembre ? "Allez viens, on sauve le monde" dès 16h30 à #MixartMyryrs : dans le cadre d’Alternatiba 2018, Diopside & Tv Bruits s’associent à Mix’art Myrys, Alternatiba Toulouse, #Tetalab, Patchwork & Scratch Assembly pour une soirée de création, d’inspiration et de musique le mercredi 26 septembre de 16h30 à 23h30 à Mix’art Myrys.

Au programme

APPRENDRE, EXPÉRIMENTER ET PARTAGER


16h30 > 18h30 : #Ateliers Tetalab, Tv Bruits et Patch_work

DÉCOUVRIR, SE RENCONTRER ET ÉCHANGER


19h00 > 20h30 : Projection du #documentaire “Les Petites Gouttes”
21h00> 21h30 : Performance musicale “Work Song”

SCRATCHER, SE DÉTENDRE ET DANSER


21h30 > 23h30 : Scratch session avec la Scratch Assembly

http://allezviens.tvbruits.org/

– #scratch #ateliers #projection

En septembre avec Alternatiba à Toulouse


Retrouvez tout le programme #alternatiba en septembre à #Toulouse :

https://alternatiba.eu/toulouse/tour-alternatiba-2018/programme/

– #Alternatives #Transition #FeteDesPossibles #TourAlternatiba

 
Immagine/foto

"Allez viens, on sauve le monde !", mercredi 26 septembre à Mix'art Myrys à #Toulouse


Vous faites quoi le mercredi 26 septembre ? "Allez viens, on sauve le monde" dès 16h30 à #MixartMyryrs : dans le cadre d’Alternatiba 2018, Diopside & Tv Bruits s’associent à Mix’art Myrys, Alternatiba Toulouse, #Tetalab, Patchwork & Scratch Assembly pour une soirée de création, d’inspiration et de musique le mercredi 26 septembre de 16h30 à 23h30 à Mix’art Myrys.

Au programme

APPRENDRE, EXPÉRIMENTER ET PARTAGER


16h30 > 18h30 : #Ateliers Tetalab, Tv Bruits et Patch_work

DÉCOUVRIR, SE RENCONTRER ET ÉCHANGER


19h00 > 20h30 : Projection du #documentaire “Les Petites Gouttes”
21h00> 21h30 : Performance musicale “Work Song”

SCRATCHER, SE DÉTENDRE ET DANSER


21h30 > 23h30 : Scratch session avec la Scratch Assembly

http://allezviens.tvbruits.org/

– #scratch #ateliers #projection

En septembre avec Alternatiba à Toulouse


Retrouvez tout le programme #alternatiba en septembre à #Toulouse :

https://alternatiba.eu/toulouse/tour-alternatiba-2018/programme/

– #Alternatives #Transition #FeteDesPossibles #TourAlternatiba

 
Linux: Alternative Browsers - last update: 2018

update: 2018.04


PaleMoon (Mozilla code base) was just updated and released https://www.palemoon.org/releasenotes.shtml


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivaldi_(web_browser)

Immagine/foto

Vivaldi is a freeware, cross-platform web browser developed by Vivaldi Technologies, a company founded by Opera Software co-founder and former CEO Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner and Tatsuki Tomita. The browser was officially launched on April 12, 2016.[8][9] The browser is aimed at staunch technologists, heavy Internet users, and previous Opera web browser users disgruntled by Opera’s transition from the Presto layout engine to the Blink layout engine, which removed many popular features.[8][10] Vivaldi aims to revive the old, popular features of Opera 12.[11] The browser has gained popularity since the launch of its first technical preview.[12][13] The browser has 1 million users as of January 2017.[14]

Checkout: IceCat


Immagine/foto

Which browser to surf freely? # 2 Independent


Immagine/foto

this question immediately brings another question along:

What html rendering engine should i use? (can i trust)


A web browser engine (sometimes called layout engine or rendering engine) is a program that renders marked up content (such as HTML, XML, image files, etc.) and formatting information (such as CSS, XSL, etc.).

A layout engine is a typical component of web browsers, email clients, e-book readers, on-line help systems or other applications that require the displaying (and editing) of web content.

source: [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_browser_engine]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_browser_engine[/url]

Graphical

Immagine/fotoImmagine/fotoImmagine/foto Immagine/foto

You can surf netsurf’s source-code here: http://www.netsurf-browser.org/downloads/source/

Text-based

Immagine/foto

Historical

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_layout_engines

General information


Basic general information about the engines.

EngineDeveloper(s)Software licenseLeading applicationTarget application(s)Programming languageBlink[note 1]Google, Opera, Samsung, Intel, others[2]GNU LGPL, BSD-styleGoogle ChromeGoogle Chrome & Opera from 15.0C++DilloDillo developersGNU LGPLDilloDilloCEdgeHTML[note 2]MicrosoftProprietaryEdgeEdgeC++[3]GeckoNetscape/Mozilla FoundationMPLMozilla FirefoxMozilla Firefox & Mozilla ThunderbirdC++Goanna[note 3]Moonchild ProductionsMPLPale MoonPale Moon & FossaMailC++GtkHTML[note 4]GNOMEGNU LGPLNovell EvolutionNovell EvolutionCHubbubAndrew SidwellMIT[4]NetSurfNetSurfCiCab[note 4]Alexander ClaussProprietaryiCabiCab?KHTMLKDEGNU LGPLKonquerorKonqueror & KMailC++NetFrontAccess Co.ProprietaryNetFrontNetFront?PrestoOpera SoftwareProprietaryOperaOpera[note 5]C++[5]PrinceYesLogic Pty LtdProprietaryPrincePrince (formerly called Prince XML)MercuryTasman[note 4]MicrosoftProprietaryMicrosoft EntourageInternet Explorer for Mac & Microsoft Entourage?The Bat!RitlabsProprietaryThe Bat!The Bat!DelphiTrident[note 4]MicrosoftProprietaryInternet ExplorerInternet ExplorerC++[6]ServoMozilla FoundationMPLRustWebKit[note 6]Apple, KDE, Nokia, BlackBerry, Palm, othersGNU LGPL, BSD-styleApple SafariApple SafariC++XEPRenderXProprietaryXEPXEPJavasource: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_web_browser_engines

Google translated transcript of: http://www.edeation.fr/surfer-librement-les-navigateurs-independants/

Posted November 17, 2014 in Internet / mail , security / privacy and tagged browser by edeation . | Leave a comment

I spoke last week of derivatives free browsers to surf freely on the internet. Here today following withindependent browsers.

We start with QupZilla, light free Web browser (licensed under GPLv3) and cross-platform for the general public.

QupZilla offers extensive integration in standard desktop environments, without neglecting the customization options (many themes available).

In short, it was developed in the idea that „light“ does not necessarily mean „lack of features„.

Screenshots


Immagine/foto

Immagine/foto

Install

apt-get install qupzilla; # install qupzillaAbout QupZilla


QupZilla is a new and very fast QtWebEngine browser.

QtWebEngine integrates Chromium’s fast moving web capabilities into Qt. So it’s the same codebase as Sware Iron and Google Chrome.

You could checkout it’s 10Gbytes of source-code here: [url=https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromium/src.git]https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromium/src.git[/url]

Don’t expect it to play Youtube. If you wanna watch Youtube you could download any video with jdownloader.org

It aims to be a lightweight web browser available through all major platforms.

This project has been originally started only for educational purposes. But from its start, QupZilla has grown into a feature-rich browser.

QupZilla has all standard functions you expect from a web browser. It includes bookmarks, history (both also in sidebar) and tabs. Above that, it has by default enabled blocking ads with a built-in AdBlock plugin.

History


The very first version of QupZilla has been released in December 2010 and it was written in Python with PyQt4 bindings. After a few versions, QupZilla has been completely rewritten in C++ with the Qt Framework.

The Windows version of QupZilla was compiled using MingW, but due to a huge problem with Flash, it is now compiled with Microsoft Visual C++ Compiler 2008. First public release was 1.0.0-b4.

Until version 2.0, QupZilla was using QtWebKit. QtWebKit is now deprecated and new versions are using QtWebEngine.

Who creates QupZilla?


Immagine/foto
David Rosca (nowrep)

Project owner and main developer, Student at FIT CTU

IRC: nowrep (irc.freenode.net)
E-mail: nowrep at gmail dot com
Jabber/XMPP: drosca@kdetalk.net

Apart from coding, others are contributing also by making translations or supporting QupZilla. Full list of contributors can be found here [at github].
You can also join IRC channel \#qupzilla at irc.freenode.net to chat with people involved in QupZilla.

More on that: http://dwaves.de/2016/02/16/alternative-browser-for-linux-qupzilla/

More Private, Right?


Another common assumption is that Chromium is not under Google’s direct control and so offers better privacy from intrusions such as those recently revealed on the part of the National Security Agency.

„I would say that is still an open-ended question,“ Paul B. Hill ([url=http://systemexperts.com]http://systemexperts.com)[/url] said. „You are giving developers less information when you are using Chromium. If you go to the Chrome store in Chromium, it is hard to say what additional tracking you are providing.“

The bigger risk is if you use Chromium and plug it into Google services like Gmail. If, from within Chromium, you do the sign-in authentication and do your Web browsing, you are probably providing just as much tracking information to Google as if you were running Chrome itself, according to Hill.

„That is where the developers get the majority of information from users,“ he explained. „It is not necessarily limited to any IP code in the Chrome browser itself.“

Chromium Alternatives


Users who really want to avoid as much tracking as possible would be better off using one of the Chromium derivatives or Linux distros that use tweaked versions of the Chromium browser that specifically address that ad-tracking feature and related information-gathering issues, suggested Hill.

Another advantage of this alternative-browser approach is additional security evaluations. For example, with some of these Chromium-based browsers, every time the Chromium community releases a new version, the smaller developer communities actually will evaluate the additional code.

That leads to decisions on whether or not to include the newer releases in these other third-party derivative browsers. This could have an impact on privacy and tracking that might not otherwise arise with either the Chromium core project or Google Chrome.

source: http://www.linuxinsider.com/story/79510.html

Dooble is itself a browser that focuses on privacy and user safety.

Another strong point is its universality, since Dooble currently available for FreeBSD, Linux, OS X and Windows.

Moreover, Dooble is in principle compatible with any operating system where Qt is available.

Konqueror

is a web browser and a free file manager free KDE desktop environment.

It can also display the contents of an FTP server, allowing to browse the local network and view files.

It uses KHTML rendering engine as the pages, which meets the HTML standards.

It supports JavaScript, Java applets, the CSS, SSL and other standards, as well as flash animations and video streaming.

For information this engine was taken over by Apple in its Safari browser.

Midori is a Japanese free browser that aims to be lightweight and fast.

It uses an interface based on the toolkit GTK + 2 and the rendering engine WebKitGTK + Web pages (a port of WebKit).

It has tabbed browsing (and easily Reorderable minimisables, with the option to display them vertically), a session management, management of bookmarks hierarchically by folders, the ability to search directly from the address bar (with a list of search engines), an auto-completion that shows real-time suggestions, search the page during data entry, a spell checker, a support scripts and styles, a support for Bookmarks scripted (bookmarklets), a cookie manager, a tool to selectively clean personal data (cookies …), in short, everything that makes a complete modern browser.

In the same vein, Kazehakase is another Japanese multilingual browser for Linux with GTK + 2 interface. It uses Gecko HTML rendering engine. However, the authors consider the possibility of using other renderers like GtkHTML, Dillo or w3m. Since version 0.4.5 release in early April 2007, Kazehakase may, on an experimental basis, rely on GTK + WebCore. And for information, it is the default browser shipped on the GNU / Linux Fluxbuntu.

Luakit is, as its name suggests, a browser based on Webkit lua. Configuration files allow to add features (for being a little unfamiliar with lua), allowing it to be fast and lightweight default. Its extreme modularity can also be fully manage the keyboard in vim mode.

K-Meleon is a free browser designed for various Microsoft Windows operating systems and using the Gecko engine to display pages. Its originality is that it is usable with only 32 MB of RAM while supporting the tabbed browsing. Light as a feather!

BlueLightCat is another fast and lightweight browser, but nevertheless complete with tabbed browsing, a private mode browsing, ad blocker, etc.

This is actually a fork of Arora, now developed into independence.

This list does not claim to be exhaustive but I think it gives a good state of market places at the end of 2014.

Note that I have not spoken minimalist browsers such as Lynx, Links, Links2, or Dillo w3m, which are not strictly speaking mainstream browsers, but browsers in ultra-light mode for text developer or obsolete equipment.

Hv3 Web Browser

http://www.freesoftwaremagazine.com/articles/h3v_web_browser_it_dillo_killer






Lightweight Web Browsers: Do we need Flash and JavaScript?

Netsurf : Hv3 : Dillo : Links2


Nowadays the real lightweight web browsers are those without JavaScript and Flash support or with a very limited one.

Because a web browser even with the lightest interface becomes heavyweight working with the modern internet crammed with scripts and multimedia.

These browsers are not numerous and some of them are moving towards getting JavaScript support – i.e. towards dropping out of the „Lightweight web browsers“ category.

Lightweight web browsers may be more advanced – with CSS support.

Or less – no CSS support or close to that.

source: [url=http://www.kompx.com/en/lightweight-web-browsers-for-linux.htm]http://www.kompx.com/en/lightweight-web-browsers-for-linux.htm[/url]

What is in the repository?


i searched the apt cache:

[cc lang=“bash“ escaped=“true“ width=“600″]

apt-cache search browser|grep web > ./temp/apt-cache-search_browser_web.txt; # manual sort:

==== webbrowsers:
qupzilla – lightweight web browser based on libqtwebkit

hv3 – Lightweight web browser

xombrero – minimalist web browser

surf – Simple web browser by suckless community

edbrowse – /bin/ed-alike webbrowser written in C

dillo – Small and fast web browser

conkeror – keyboard focused web browser with Emacs look and feel

arora – simple cross platform web browser

epiphany-browser – Intuitive GNOME web browser

hbro – minimal KISS-compliant web browser

jd – simple browser for „2ch-style“ web forum sites

konqueror (default KDE browser) – advanced file manager, web browser and document viewer
konq-plugins – plugins for Konqueror, the KDE file/web/document browser

netsurf-common – small web browser with CSS support common files
netsurf-fb – small web browser with CSS support for framebuffers
netsurf-gtk – small web browser with CSS support for GTK

==== web editors:
bluefish – advanced Gtk+ text editor for web and software development

==== other web related stuff:

xul-ext-adblock-plus – advertisement blocking extension for web browsers

libjs-angularjs – lets you write client-side web applications as if you had a smarter browser

garmin-plugin – browser plugin for communication with the fitness websites

gurlchecker – graphical websites checker

libghc-webkit-dev – Binding to the Webkit library
libghc-webkit-doc – Binding to the Webkit library; documentation

libhttpunit-java – automated web site testing toolkit

httrack – Copy websites to your computer (Offline browser)

webhttrack – Copy websites to your computer, httrack with a Web interface

jscommunicator-web-phone – Basic SIP video-phone web page using WebRTC

jwchat – full featured, web-based Jabber chat client

libphp-snoopy – Snoopy is a PHP class that simulates a web browser

man2html – browse man pages in your web browser

ntop – display network usage in web browser

nut-cgi – network UPS tools – web interface

libjs-openlayers – JavaScript library for displaying map data in web browsers

php-horde-webmail – Horde Groupware Webmail Edition

webalizer – web server log analysis program

webdruid – Web server log file analysis tool

zeya – web music server[/cc]

Links:


http://dwaves.de/2016/02/16/alternative-browser-for-linux-qupzilla/

http://www.linuxuser.co.uk/reviews/arora-web-browser-review

https://sourceforge.net/projects/zbrowser-linux/

https://sourceforge.net/projects/bluelightcat/

Other alternative fast / lightweight browsers: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_lightweight_web_browsers

http://www.vavai.net/2010/01/7-lightweight-linux-browsers-you-may-want-to-consider-for-fast-browsing-experience/

\#linux #gnu #gnulinux #opensource #administration #sysops #alternatives #browsers #lightweight #palemoon
Quelle: http://dwaves.de/2016/02/16/linux-alternative-browsers-last-update-2018/
Linux: Alternative Browsers – last update: 2018

 
Linux: Alternative Browsers - last update: 2018

update: 2018.04


PaleMoon (Mozilla code base) was just updated and released https://www.palemoon.org/releasenotes.shtml


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivaldi_(web_browser)

Immagine/foto

Vivaldi is a freeware, cross-platform web browser developed by Vivaldi Technologies, a company founded by Opera Software co-founder and former CEO Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner and Tatsuki Tomita. The browser was officially launched on April 12, 2016.[8][9] The browser is aimed at staunch technologists, heavy Internet users, and previous Opera web browser users disgruntled by Opera’s transition from the Presto layout engine to the Blink layout engine, which removed many popular features.[8][10] Vivaldi aims to revive the old, popular features of Opera 12.[11] The browser has gained popularity since the launch of its first technical preview.[12][13] The browser has 1 million users as of January 2017.[14]

Checkout: IceCat


Immagine/foto

Which browser to surf freely? # 2 Independent


Immagine/foto

this question immediately brings another question along:

What html rendering engine should i use? (can i trust)


A web browser engine (sometimes called layout engine or rendering engine) is a program that renders marked up content (such as HTML, XML, image files, etc.) and formatting information (such as CSS, XSL, etc.).

A layout engine is a typical component of web browsers, email clients, e-book readers, on-line help systems or other applications that require the displaying (and editing) of web content.

source: [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_browser_engine]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_browser_engine[/url]

Graphical

Immagine/fotoImmagine/fotoImmagine/foto Immagine/foto

You can surf netsurf’s source-code here: http://www.netsurf-browser.org/downloads/source/

Text-based

Immagine/foto

Historical

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_layout_engines

General information


Basic general information about the engines.

EngineDeveloper(s)Software licenseLeading applicationTarget application(s)Programming languageBlink[note 1]Google, Opera, Samsung, Intel, others[2]GNU LGPL, BSD-styleGoogle ChromeGoogle Chrome & Opera from 15.0C++DilloDillo developersGNU LGPLDilloDilloCEdgeHTML[note 2]MicrosoftProprietaryEdgeEdgeC++[3]GeckoNetscape/Mozilla FoundationMPLMozilla FirefoxMozilla Firefox & Mozilla ThunderbirdC++Goanna[note 3]Moonchild ProductionsMPLPale MoonPale Moon & FossaMailC++GtkHTML[note 4]GNOMEGNU LGPLNovell EvolutionNovell EvolutionCHubbubAndrew SidwellMIT[4]NetSurfNetSurfCiCab[note 4]Alexander ClaussProprietaryiCabiCab?KHTMLKDEGNU LGPLKonquerorKonqueror & KMailC++NetFrontAccess Co.ProprietaryNetFrontNetFront?PrestoOpera SoftwareProprietaryOperaOpera[note 5]C++[5]PrinceYesLogic Pty LtdProprietaryPrincePrince (formerly called Prince XML)MercuryTasman[note 4]MicrosoftProprietaryMicrosoft EntourageInternet Explorer for Mac & Microsoft Entourage?The Bat!RitlabsProprietaryThe Bat!The Bat!DelphiTrident[note 4]MicrosoftProprietaryInternet ExplorerInternet ExplorerC++[6]ServoMozilla FoundationMPLRustWebKit[note 6]Apple, KDE, Nokia, BlackBerry, Palm, othersGNU LGPL, BSD-styleApple SafariApple SafariC++XEPRenderXProprietaryXEPXEPJavasource: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_web_browser_engines

Google translated transcript of: http://www.edeation.fr/surfer-librement-les-navigateurs-independants/

Posted November 17, 2014 in Internet / mail , security / privacy and tagged browser by edeation . | Leave a comment

I spoke last week of derivatives free browsers to surf freely on the internet. Here today following withindependent browsers.

We start with QupZilla, light free Web browser (licensed under GPLv3) and cross-platform for the general public.

QupZilla offers extensive integration in standard desktop environments, without neglecting the customization options (many themes available).

In short, it was developed in the idea that „light“ does not necessarily mean „lack of features„.

Screenshots


Immagine/foto

Immagine/foto

Install

apt-get install qupzilla; # install qupzillaAbout QupZilla


QupZilla is a new and very fast QtWebEngine browser.

QtWebEngine integrates Chromium’s fast moving web capabilities into Qt. So it’s the same codebase as Sware Iron and Google Chrome.

You could checkout it’s 10Gbytes of source-code here: [url=https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromium/src.git]https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromium/src.git[/url]

Don’t expect it to play Youtube. If you wanna watch Youtube you could download any video with jdownloader.org

It aims to be a lightweight web browser available through all major platforms.

This project has been originally started only for educational purposes. But from its start, QupZilla has grown into a feature-rich browser.

QupZilla has all standard functions you expect from a web browser. It includes bookmarks, history (both also in sidebar) and tabs. Above that, it has by default enabled blocking ads with a built-in AdBlock plugin.

History


The very first version of QupZilla has been released in December 2010 and it was written in Python with PyQt4 bindings. After a few versions, QupZilla has been completely rewritten in C++ with the Qt Framework.

The Windows version of QupZilla was compiled using MingW, but due to a huge problem with Flash, it is now compiled with Microsoft Visual C++ Compiler 2008. First public release was 1.0.0-b4.

Until version 2.0, QupZilla was using QtWebKit. QtWebKit is now deprecated and new versions are using QtWebEngine.

Who creates QupZilla?


Immagine/foto
David Rosca (nowrep)

Project owner and main developer, Student at FIT CTU

IRC: nowrep (irc.freenode.net)
E-mail: nowrep at gmail dot com
Jabber/XMPP: drosca@kdetalk.net

Apart from coding, others are contributing also by making translations or supporting QupZilla. Full list of contributors can be found here [at github].
You can also join IRC channel \#qupzilla at irc.freenode.net to chat with people involved in QupZilla.

More on that: http://dwaves.de/2016/02/16/alternative-browser-for-linux-qupzilla/

More Private, Right?


Another common assumption is that Chromium is not under Google’s direct control and so offers better privacy from intrusions such as those recently revealed on the part of the National Security Agency.

„I would say that is still an open-ended question,“ Paul B. Hill ([url=http://systemexperts.com]http://systemexperts.com)[/url] said. „You are giving developers less information when you are using Chromium. If you go to the Chrome store in Chromium, it is hard to say what additional tracking you are providing.“

The bigger risk is if you use Chromium and plug it into Google services like Gmail. If, from within Chromium, you do the sign-in authentication and do your Web browsing, you are probably providing just as much tracking information to Google as if you were running Chrome itself, according to Hill.

„That is where the developers get the majority of information from users,“ he explained. „It is not necessarily limited to any IP code in the Chrome browser itself.“

Chromium Alternatives


Users who really want to avoid as much tracking as possible would be better off using one of the Chromium derivatives or Linux distros that use tweaked versions of the Chromium browser that specifically address that ad-tracking feature and related information-gathering issues, suggested Hill.

Another advantage of this alternative-browser approach is additional security evaluations. For example, with some of these Chromium-based browsers, every time the Chromium community releases a new version, the smaller developer communities actually will evaluate the additional code.

That leads to decisions on whether or not to include the newer releases in these other third-party derivative browsers. This could have an impact on privacy and tracking that might not otherwise arise with either the Chromium core project or Google Chrome.

source: http://www.linuxinsider.com/story/79510.html

Dooble is itself a browser that focuses on privacy and user safety.

Another strong point is its universality, since Dooble currently available for FreeBSD, Linux, OS X and Windows.

Moreover, Dooble is in principle compatible with any operating system where Qt is available.

Konqueror

is a web browser and a free file manager free KDE desktop environment.

It can also display the contents of an FTP server, allowing to browse the local network and view files.

It uses KHTML rendering engine as the pages, which meets the HTML standards.

It supports JavaScript, Java applets, the CSS, SSL and other standards, as well as flash animations and video streaming.

For information this engine was taken over by Apple in its Safari browser.

Midori is a Japanese free browser that aims to be lightweight and fast.

It uses an interface based on the toolkit GTK + 2 and the rendering engine WebKitGTK + Web pages (a port of WebKit).

It has tabbed browsing (and easily Reorderable minimisables, with the option to display them vertically), a session management, management of bookmarks hierarchically by folders, the ability to search directly from the address bar (with a list of search engines), an auto-completion that shows real-time suggestions, search the page during data entry, a spell checker, a support scripts and styles, a support for Bookmarks scripted (bookmarklets), a cookie manager, a tool to selectively clean personal data (cookies …), in short, everything that makes a complete modern browser.

In the same vein, Kazehakase is another Japanese multilingual browser for Linux with GTK + 2 interface. It uses Gecko HTML rendering engine. However, the authors consider the possibility of using other renderers like GtkHTML, Dillo or w3m. Since version 0.4.5 release in early April 2007, Kazehakase may, on an experimental basis, rely on GTK + WebCore. And for information, it is the default browser shipped on the GNU / Linux Fluxbuntu.

Luakit is, as its name suggests, a browser based on Webkit lua. Configuration files allow to add features (for being a little unfamiliar with lua), allowing it to be fast and lightweight default. Its extreme modularity can also be fully manage the keyboard in vim mode.

K-Meleon is a free browser designed for various Microsoft Windows operating systems and using the Gecko engine to display pages. Its originality is that it is usable with only 32 MB of RAM while supporting the tabbed browsing. Light as a feather!

BlueLightCat is another fast and lightweight browser, but nevertheless complete with tabbed browsing, a private mode browsing, ad blocker, etc.

This is actually a fork of Arora, now developed into independence.

This list does not claim to be exhaustive but I think it gives a good state of market places at the end of 2014.

Note that I have not spoken minimalist browsers such as Lynx, Links, Links2, or Dillo w3m, which are not strictly speaking mainstream browsers, but browsers in ultra-light mode for text developer or obsolete equipment.

Hv3 Web Browser

http://www.freesoftwaremagazine.com/articles/h3v_web_browser_it_dillo_killer






Lightweight Web Browsers: Do we need Flash and JavaScript?

Netsurf : Hv3 : Dillo : Links2


Nowadays the real lightweight web browsers are those without JavaScript and Flash support or with a very limited one.

Because a web browser even with the lightest interface becomes heavyweight working with the modern internet crammed with scripts and multimedia.

These browsers are not numerous and some of them are moving towards getting JavaScript support – i.e. towards dropping out of the „Lightweight web browsers“ category.

Lightweight web browsers may be more advanced – with CSS support.

Or less – no CSS support or close to that.

source: [url=http://www.kompx.com/en/lightweight-web-browsers-for-linux.htm]http://www.kompx.com/en/lightweight-web-browsers-for-linux.htm[/url]

What is in the repository?


i searched the apt cache:

[cc lang=“bash“ escaped=“true“ width=“600″]

apt-cache search browser|grep web > ./temp/apt-cache-search_browser_web.txt; # manual sort:

==== webbrowsers:
qupzilla – lightweight web browser based on libqtwebkit

hv3 – Lightweight web browser

xombrero – minimalist web browser

surf – Simple web browser by suckless community

edbrowse – /bin/ed-alike webbrowser written in C

dillo – Small and fast web browser

conkeror – keyboard focused web browser with Emacs look and feel

arora – simple cross platform web browser

epiphany-browser – Intuitive GNOME web browser

hbro – minimal KISS-compliant web browser

jd – simple browser for „2ch-style“ web forum sites

konqueror (default KDE browser) – advanced file manager, web browser and document viewer
konq-plugins – plugins for Konqueror, the KDE file/web/document browser

netsurf-common – small web browser with CSS support common files
netsurf-fb – small web browser with CSS support for framebuffers
netsurf-gtk – small web browser with CSS support for GTK

==== web editors:
bluefish – advanced Gtk+ text editor for web and software development

==== other web related stuff:

xul-ext-adblock-plus – advertisement blocking extension for web browsers

libjs-angularjs – lets you write client-side web applications as if you had a smarter browser

garmin-plugin – browser plugin for communication with the fitness websites

gurlchecker – graphical websites checker

libghc-webkit-dev – Binding to the Webkit library
libghc-webkit-doc – Binding to the Webkit library; documentation

libhttpunit-java – automated web site testing toolkit

httrack – Copy websites to your computer (Offline browser)

webhttrack – Copy websites to your computer, httrack with a Web interface

jscommunicator-web-phone – Basic SIP video-phone web page using WebRTC

jwchat – full featured, web-based Jabber chat client

libphp-snoopy – Snoopy is a PHP class that simulates a web browser

man2html – browse man pages in your web browser

ntop – display network usage in web browser

nut-cgi – network UPS tools – web interface

libjs-openlayers – JavaScript library for displaying map data in web browsers

php-horde-webmail – Horde Groupware Webmail Edition

webalizer – web server log analysis program

webdruid – Web server log file analysis tool

zeya – web music server[/cc]

Links:


http://dwaves.de/2016/02/16/alternative-browser-for-linux-qupzilla/

http://www.linuxuser.co.uk/reviews/arora-web-browser-review

https://sourceforge.net/projects/zbrowser-linux/

https://sourceforge.net/projects/bluelightcat/

Other alternative fast / lightweight browsers: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_lightweight_web_browsers

http://www.vavai.net/2010/01/7-lightweight-linux-browsers-you-may-want-to-consider-for-fast-browsing-experience/

\#linux #gnu #gnulinux #opensource #administration #sysops #alternatives #browsers #lightweight #palemoon
Quelle: http://dwaves.de/2016/02/16/linux-alternative-browsers-last-update-2018/
Linux: Alternative Browsers – last update: 2018

 
If you're fed up of #Amazon's tax dodging, poor working conditions and data gathering, here are some book-themed ethical alternatives on #PrimeDay:

https://switching.social/ethical-alternatives-to-amazon-and-goodreads/

#Books #eBooks #Kindle #Goodreads #DeleteAmazon #DeleteKindle #AmazonStrike #Alternatives #Privacy
Ethical alternatives to Amazon Books, Kindle and Goodreads

 
If you're fed up of #Amazon's tax dodging, poor working conditions and data gathering, here are some book-themed ethical alternatives on #PrimeDay:

https://switching.social/ethical-alternatives-to-amazon-and-goodreads/

#Books #eBooks #Kindle #Goodreads #DeleteAmazon #DeleteKindle #AmazonStrike #Alternatives #Privacy
Ethical alternatives to Amazon Books, Kindle, Audible and Goodreads

 
If you're fed up of #Amazon's tax dodging, poor working conditions and data gathering, here are some book-themed ethical alternatives on #PrimeDay:

https://switching.social/ethical-alternatives-to-amazon-and-goodreads/

#Books #eBooks #Kindle #Goodreads #DeleteAmazon #DeleteKindle #AmazonStrike #Alternatives #Privacy
Ethical alternatives to Amazon Books, Kindle and Goodreads

 
If you're fed up of #Amazon's tax dodging, poor working conditions and data gathering, here are some book-themed ethical alternatives on #PrimeDay:

https://switching.social/ethical-alternatives-to-amazon-and-goodreads/

#Books #eBooks #Kindle #Goodreads #DeleteAmazon #DeleteKindle #AmazonStrike #Alternatives #Privacy
Ethical alternatives to Amazon Books, Kindle and Goodreads

 
Bonjour à tous!
Je suis en train de faire une #recherche sur la #décroissance pour un projet. Je m'intéresse notamment aux #alternatives en #architecture. J'ai commencé à me renseigner plus sur les #earthships que je connais depuis un moment mais le fait qu'il s'agisse d'une marque déposée m'agace un peu. Est-ce qu'il y en a parmi vous qui s'y connaîtraient sur le sujet des #architectures #auto-suffisantes qui fonctionnent dans les conditions climatiques européennes? Merci d'avance de votre #aide

 
Bonjour à tous!
Je suis en train de faire une #recherche sur la #décroissance pour un projet. Je m'intéresse notamment aux #alternatives en #architecture. J'ai commencé à me renseigner plus sur les #earthships que je connais depuis un moment mais le fait qu'il s'agisse d'une marque déposée m'agace un peu. Est-ce qu'il y en a parmi vous qui s'y connaîtraient sur le sujet des #architectures #auto-suffisantes qui fonctionnent dans les conditions climatiques européennes? Merci d'avance de votre #aide

 

Alternatives to Google Products


If you're ready to start using Google alternatives, this guide will provide you with all your options. We cover alternatives for every Google product.
Article word count: 1418

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17280558
Posted by wuschel (karma: 755)
Post stats: Points: 143 - Comments: 62 - 2018-06-10T22:37:07Z

\#HackerNews #alternatives #google #products
Article content:




[1]Google Alternatives

It’s been fun Google, but it’s time to say goodbye.

Have you noticed?

Google’s entire business model is based on you surrendering to their corporate surveillance. That’s it. All they do is repackage mass corporate surveillance into convenient, free, trendy applications that suck up all your data. Your private data helps Google dominate the online advertising market.

You are the product.

The other key issue to consider here is that Google is tracking and recording your activity in order to build a user profile, which can be used for various purposes. Google has many ways to track your activity, even if you are not logged into a Google account:
\* Tracking through Google Adsense (all those annoying banner ads you see on most websites also function as tracking)
\* Tracking through YouTube and other Google-owned platforms and products
\* Tracking through websites that use Google Analytics (most websites use Google analytics – but not Restore Privacy)

All the data that Google collects about you is usually monitored through targeted advertising (Google is now the largest advertising company in the world). Your data may also be provided to government authorities (Google has been [2]cooperating with governments for mass surveillance since 2009).

In other words, Google is working to track your every move online, even if you are working hard to avoid it.

The solution to this problem basically entails:

Google search alternatives

When it comes to privacy, using Google search is not a good idea. When you use their search engine, Google is recording your IP address, search terms, user agent, and often a unique identifier, which is stored in cookies.

Here are a few Google search alternatives:
\* [3]Searx – A very privacy-friendly and versatile search engine.
\* [4]Qwant – A private search engine based in France.
\* [5]Metager – A private search engine based in Germany.
\* [6]DuckDuckGo – This is a great privacy-friendly Google alternative that doesn’t utilize tracking or targeted ads. They also have a zero-sharing policy with other features, but they do record search terms.
\* [7]StartPage – StartPage is basically Google, but without the tracking.

Check out the [8]private search engine guide for additional information.

Gmail alternatives

Gmail is one of the worst products you can use if you’re concerned about privacy. Everything you do through Gmail is collected by the parent company – every email, attachment, and image… Using Gmail gives Google an intimate view of your private life and personal contacts.

When you remain logged in to your Gmail account, Google can easily track your activities online as you browse different websites, which may be hosting Google Analytics or Google ads (Adsense).

There are many different privacy email options, but here are a few popular choices:
\* [9]Mailfence – Based in Belgium – 500 MB free; 20 GB Pro
\* [10]Tutanota – Based in Germany – 1 GB free; 10 GB Pro
\* [11]Mailbox.org – Based in Germany – 2 GB storage
\* [12]Protonmail – Based in Switzerland – 500 MB free; 5 GB Pro

You can try any of the options above to find the best Gmail alternative for your situation.

[13]best gmail alternativeMailfence offers 500 MB of free storage and instant setup (no payment details required).

Many providers, such as [14]Mailfence and [15]Tutanota offer completely free accounts up to a certain storage limit.

Chrome alternatives

Google Chrome is a popular browser, but it’s recording and tracking everything you do. So check out these alternatives instead:
\* [16]Firefox browser – This is a free, open-source internet browser that’s quite popular. You can also use a variety of privacy add-ons that can block ads and tracking (but beware of browser fingerprinting).
\* [17]Tor browser – This is simply a hardened, privacy-friendly version of Firefox. You won’t need any add-ons or extensions because it’s already configured for privacy and security. That being said, it may be overkill for most users, because it will break many of the websites you visit (thanks to NoScript).
\* [18]Brave browser – Brave is a good browser with build-in privacy protections and ad blocking. However, it is also based on Chromium and is affected by the [19]WebRTC leak issue.

Check out the [20]Firefox privacy guide, which explains different privacy and security modifications you can make with Firefox.

Google Drive alternatives

If you’re looking for a secure cloud storage option, you can check out these Google drive alternatives. They are more secure and better for protecting your privacy and data.
\* [21]TeamDrive – This is a business-oriented cloud backup and file synchronization option based in Germany.
\* [22]Tresorit – This is a user-friendly cloud storage option based in Switzerland. They offer client-side encryption, but also utilize Microsoft Windows servers, which is one drawback.
\* [23]Nextcloud – Nextcloud is an open source, self-hosted file share and communication platform. They are based in Germany.

YouTube alternatives

Unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be many popular YouTube alternatives, but here are a few:
\* Vimeo
\* Dailymotion
\* Bitchute
\* Hooktube

Hooktube – Hooktube is basically a YouTube proxy, which allows you to unblock YouTube videos, download videos, and get around YouTube censorship restrictions (unless YouTube deletes the video completely). This also helps to keep your data from Google.

How to use Hooktube: Just replace the domain in any YT link with hooktube.com and you get a light-weight page that loads YouTube’s media files (mp4, webm, etc) directly into your browser’s native media player. https://youtube.com/watch?v=S6bOkFLrsAc becomes https://hooktube.com/watch?v=S6bOkFLrsAc, etc. Supported parameters: start, end, loop (1 for on), speed (range: 0.01 to 4), autoplay (0 for off, default is 1).

And lastly, you can also check out the [24]unblock YouTube guide for additional solutions.

Google analytics alternative

If you’re running a website, it’s important to see which content people like the most, so you can give your readers what they want. Otherwise publishing articles is like throwing darts blindfolded at a wall. Unfortunately, Google Analytics goes overboard with the tracking. Here are a few alternatives:
\* [25]Matomo (formerly Piwik) is a great open-source analytics program that respects the privacy of visitors by anonymizing and truncating visitor IP addresses. It’s the only analytics service that is [26]certified to respect user privacy (and the only analytics used on this site).
\* [27]Clicky is another alternative, but does not have the built-in privacy protections of Matomo.

Many websites host Google Analytics because they run Google Adsense campaigns. Without Google Analytics, tracking performance of these campaigns would be difficult. Nonetheless, this is still bad for privacy.

Google Maps alternative

A map alternative for PCs is [28]OpenStreetMap.

A few Google Maps alternatives for mobile devices include:
\* [29]Maps (F Droid) uses OpenStreetMap data (offline).
\* [30]Here WeGo provides good mapping solutions for both PCs and mobile devices with their app.
\* [31]Maps.Me is another option that is free on both Android and iOS, but there is a fair amount of data collection with this alternative, as explained in their [32]privacy policy.

Google Play Store alternative

Currently the best Google Play Store alternative is to use F-Droid and then go through the Yalp store.

As explained on the [33]official site, F-Droid is an installable catalog of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) applications for the Android platform.

After you have installed F-Droid, you can then download the Yalp store APK, which allows you to download apps from the Google Play Store directly as APK files.

[34]google play store alternativeThe Yalp Store is a good alternative to the Google Play Store.

You can learn more about Yalp and download it from the [35]F-Droid website here. (See also the official [36]GitHub page here for more info.)

Google Calendar alternative

The best Google Calendar alternative seems to be [37]Etar, which is open source, simple, and respects your privacy.

Another good option is the aCalendar from TAPIRapps. This appears to be another good option that respects your privacy and it also has some good features. Check it out on the [38]official site here.

Two other Google Calendar alternatives are Kin and Fruxx. However, if you read through the privacy policies, it looks like Etar or aCalendar would be the better options. This is because both Kin and Fruux collect user/calendar data.

Do you care about your privacy?

Most people looking for Google alternatives have woken up to the fact that Google is awful for privacy because they collect as much of your private data as possible.

But what about your internet service provider?

In the United States, United Kingdom, and [39]Australia, internet service providers are also recording your online activity. This information can be legally sold to third parties (in the US), or saved in government databases to be potentially used against you (UK, US, and Australia).

Aside from government surveillance agencies, there are many other third parties that are quietly tracking your online activity, such as [40]Facebook.

One of the best tools for keeping your data out of the hands of third parties is to use a virtual private network. This will encrypt and anonymize your online activity, while also hiding your true IP address and location. Check out the [41]best VPN service guide for the latest recommendations and test results.

The [42]privacy tools guide discusses other solutions as well.

Stay safe!

References

Visible links
2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PRISM_(surveillance_program)
3. https://searx.me/
4. https://www.qwant.com/
5. https://metager.de/en
6. https://duckduckgo.com/
7. https://www.startpage.com/
8. https://restoreprivacy.com/private-search-engine/
9. https://mailfence.com/
10. https://tutanota.com/
11. https://mailbox.org/en/
12. https://protonmail.com/
14. https://mailfence.com/
15. https://tutanota.com/
16. https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/new/
17. https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en
18. https://brave.com/
19. https://restoreprivacy.com/webrtc-leaks/
20. https://restoreprivacy.com/firefox-privacy/
21. http://www.teamdrive.com/
22. https://www.startpage.com/
23. https://nextcloud.com/
24. https://restoreprivacy.com/unblock-youtube/
25. https://matomo.org/
26. https://matomo.org/privacy/
27. https://clicky.com/
28. https://www.openstreetmap.org/
29. https://f-droid.org/en/packages/com.github.axet.maps/
30. https://here.com/en/products-services/consumer-app/here-wego-app
31. http://maps.me/en/home
32. https://legal.my.com/us/maps/privacy/
33. https://f-droid.org/en/
35. https://f-droid.org/packages/com.github.yeriomin.yalpstore/
36. https://github.com/yeriomin/YalpStore
37. https://github.com/Etar-Group/Etar-Calendar
38. http://www.tapirapps.de/en/features.htm
39. https://restoreprivacy.com/australia-vpn/
40. https://restoreprivacy.com/facebook-privacy/
41. https://restoreprivacy.com/best-vpn/
42. https://restoreprivacy.com/privacy-tools/

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 116 - Loop: 61 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 25
Alternatives to Google Products – The Complete List

 

Alternatives to Google Products


If you're ready to start using Google alternatives, this guide will provide you with all your options. We cover alternatives for every Google product.
Article word count: 1418

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17280558
Posted by wuschel (karma: 755)
Post stats: Points: 143 - Comments: 62 - 2018-06-10T22:37:07Z

\#HackerNews #alternatives #google #products
Article content:




[1]Google Alternatives

It’s been fun Google, but it’s time to say goodbye.

Have you noticed?

Google’s entire business model is based on you surrendering to their corporate surveillance. That’s it. All they do is repackage mass corporate surveillance into convenient, free, trendy applications that suck up all your data. Your private data helps Google dominate the online advertising market.

You are the product.

The other key issue to consider here is that Google is tracking and recording your activity in order to build a user profile, which can be used for various purposes. Google has many ways to track your activity, even if you are not logged into a Google account:
\* Tracking through Google Adsense (all those annoying banner ads you see on most websites also function as tracking)
\* Tracking through YouTube and other Google-owned platforms and products
\* Tracking through websites that use Google Analytics (most websites use Google analytics – but not Restore Privacy)

All the data that Google collects about you is usually monitored through targeted advertising (Google is now the largest advertising company in the world). Your data may also be provided to government authorities (Google has been [2]cooperating with governments for mass surveillance since 2009).

In other words, Google is working to track your every move online, even if you are working hard to avoid it.

The solution to this problem basically entails:

Google search alternatives

When it comes to privacy, using Google search is not a good idea. When you use their search engine, Google is recording your IP address, search terms, user agent, and often a unique identifier, which is stored in cookies.

Here are a few Google search alternatives:
\* [3]Searx – A very privacy-friendly and versatile search engine.
\* [4]Qwant – A private search engine based in France.
\* [5]Metager – A private search engine based in Germany.
\* [6]DuckDuckGo – This is a great privacy-friendly Google alternative that doesn’t utilize tracking or targeted ads. They also have a zero-sharing policy with other features, but they do record search terms.
\* [7]StartPage – StartPage is basically Google, but without the tracking.

Check out the [8]private search engine guide for additional information.

Gmail alternatives

Gmail is one of the worst products you can use if you’re concerned about privacy. Everything you do through Gmail is collected by the parent company – every email, attachment, and image… Using Gmail gives Google an intimate view of your private life and personal contacts.

When you remain logged in to your Gmail account, Google can easily track your activities online as you browse different websites, which may be hosting Google Analytics or Google ads (Adsense).

There are many different privacy email options, but here are a few popular choices:
\* [9]Mailfence – Based in Belgium – 500 MB free; 20 GB Pro
\* [10]Tutanota – Based in Germany – 1 GB free; 10 GB Pro
\* [11]Mailbox.org – Based in Germany – 2 GB storage
\* [12]Protonmail – Based in Switzerland – 500 MB free; 5 GB Pro

You can try any of the options above to find the best Gmail alternative for your situation.

[13]best gmail alternativeMailfence offers 500 MB of free storage and instant setup (no payment details required).

Many providers, such as [14]Mailfence and [15]Tutanota offer completely free accounts up to a certain storage limit.

Chrome alternatives

Google Chrome is a popular browser, but it’s recording and tracking everything you do. So check out these alternatives instead:
\* [16]Firefox browser – This is a free, open-source internet browser that’s quite popular. You can also use a variety of privacy add-ons that can block ads and tracking (but beware of browser fingerprinting).
\* [17]Tor browser – This is simply a hardened, privacy-friendly version of Firefox. You won’t need any add-ons or extensions because it’s already configured for privacy and security. That being said, it may be overkill for most users, because it will break many of the websites you visit (thanks to NoScript).
\* [18]Brave browser – Brave is a good browser with build-in privacy protections and ad blocking. However, it is also based on Chromium and is affected by the [19]WebRTC leak issue.

Check out the [20]Firefox privacy guide, which explains different privacy and security modifications you can make with Firefox.

Google Drive alternatives

If you’re looking for a secure cloud storage option, you can check out these Google drive alternatives. They are more secure and better for protecting your privacy and data.
\* [21]TeamDrive – This is a business-oriented cloud backup and file synchronization option based in Germany.
\* [22]Tresorit – This is a user-friendly cloud storage option based in Switzerland. They offer client-side encryption, but also utilize Microsoft Windows servers, which is one drawback.
\* [23]Nextcloud – Nextcloud is an open source, self-hosted file share and communication platform. They are based in Germany.

YouTube alternatives

Unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be many popular YouTube alternatives, but here are a few:
\* Vimeo
\* Dailymotion
\* Bitchute
\* Hooktube

Hooktube – Hooktube is basically a YouTube proxy, which allows you to unblock YouTube videos, download videos, and get around YouTube censorship restrictions (unless YouTube deletes the video completely). This also helps to keep your data from Google.

How to use Hooktube: Just replace the domain in any YT link with hooktube.com and you get a light-weight page that loads YouTube’s media files (mp4, webm, etc) directly into your browser’s native media player. https://youtube.com/watch?v=S6bOkFLrsAc becomes https://hooktube.com/watch?v=S6bOkFLrsAc, etc. Supported parameters: start, end, loop (1 for on), speed (range: 0.01 to 4), autoplay (0 for off, default is 1).

And lastly, you can also check out the [24]unblock YouTube guide for additional solutions.

Google analytics alternative

If you’re running a website, it’s important to see which content people like the most, so you can give your readers what they want. Otherwise publishing articles is like throwing darts blindfolded at a wall. Unfortunately, Google Analytics goes overboard with the tracking. Here are a few alternatives:
\* [25]Matomo (formerly Piwik) is a great open-source analytics program that respects the privacy of visitors by anonymizing and truncating visitor IP addresses. It’s the only analytics service that is [26]certified to respect user privacy (and the only analytics used on this site).
\* [27]Clicky is another alternative, but does not have the built-in privacy protections of Matomo.

Many websites host Google Analytics because they run Google Adsense campaigns. Without Google Analytics, tracking performance of these campaigns would be difficult. Nonetheless, this is still bad for privacy.

Google Maps alternative

A map alternative for PCs is [28]OpenStreetMap.

A few Google Maps alternatives for mobile devices include:
\* [29]Maps (F Droid) uses OpenStreetMap data (offline).
\* [30]Here WeGo provides good mapping solutions for both PCs and mobile devices with their app.
\* [31]Maps.Me is another option that is free on both Android and iOS, but there is a fair amount of data collection with this alternative, as explained in their [32]privacy policy.

Google Play Store alternative

Currently the best Google Play Store alternative is to use F-Droid and then go through the Yalp store.

As explained on the [33]official site, F-Droid is an installable catalog of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) applications for the Android platform.

After you have installed F-Droid, you can then download the Yalp store APK, which allows you to download apps from the Google Play Store directly as APK files.

[34]google play store alternativeThe Yalp Store is a good alternative to the Google Play Store.

You can learn more about Yalp and download it from the [35]F-Droid website here. (See also the official [36]GitHub page here for more info.)

Google Calendar alternative

The best Google Calendar alternative seems to be [37]Etar, which is open source, simple, and respects your privacy.

Another good option is the aCalendar from TAPIRapps. This appears to be another good option that respects your privacy and it also has some good features. Check it out on the [38]official site here.

Two other Google Calendar alternatives are Kin and Fruxx. However, if you read through the privacy policies, it looks like Etar or aCalendar would be the better options. This is because both Kin and Fruux collect user/calendar data.

Do you care about your privacy?

Most people looking for Google alternatives have woken up to the fact that Google is awful for privacy because they collect as much of your private data as possible.

But what about your internet service provider?

In the United States, United Kingdom, and [39]Australia, internet service providers are also recording your online activity. This information can be legally sold to third parties (in the US), or saved in government databases to be potentially used against you (UK, US, and Australia).

Aside from government surveillance agencies, there are many other third parties that are quietly tracking your online activity, such as [40]Facebook.

One of the best tools for keeping your data out of the hands of third parties is to use a virtual private network. This will encrypt and anonymize your online activity, while also hiding your true IP address and location. Check out the [41]best VPN service guide for the latest recommendations and test results.

The [42]privacy tools guide discusses other solutions as well.

Stay safe!

References

Visible links
2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PRISM_(surveillance_program)
3. https://searx.me/
4. https://www.qwant.com/
5. https://metager.de/en
6. https://duckduckgo.com/
7. https://www.startpage.com/
8. https://restoreprivacy.com/private-search-engine/
9. https://mailfence.com/
10. https://tutanota.com/
11. https://mailbox.org/en/
12. https://protonmail.com/
14. https://mailfence.com/
15. https://tutanota.com/
16. https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/new/
17. https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en
18. https://brave.com/
19. https://restoreprivacy.com/webrtc-leaks/
20. https://restoreprivacy.com/firefox-privacy/
21. http://www.teamdrive.com/
22. https://www.startpage.com/
23. https://nextcloud.com/
24. https://restoreprivacy.com/unblock-youtube/
25. https://matomo.org/
26. https://matomo.org/privacy/
27. https://clicky.com/
28. https://www.openstreetmap.org/
29. https://f-droid.org/en/packages/com.github.axet.maps/
30. https://here.com/en/products-services/consumer-app/here-wego-app
31. http://maps.me/en/home
32. https://legal.my.com/us/maps/privacy/
33. https://f-droid.org/en/
35. https://f-droid.org/packages/com.github.yeriomin.yalpstore/
36. https://github.com/yeriomin/YalpStore
37. https://github.com/Etar-Group/Etar-Calendar
38. http://www.tapirapps.de/en/features.htm
39. https://restoreprivacy.com/australia-vpn/
40. https://restoreprivacy.com/facebook-privacy/
41. https://restoreprivacy.com/best-vpn/
42. https://restoreprivacy.com/privacy-tools/

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 116 - Loop: 61 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 25
Alternatives to Google Products – The Complete List

 

Dans la Drôme, cette école participative forme les jeunes générations à l'écologie



#éducation #école #Drome #alternatives #jeunesse

 

Face à la destruction de nos terres, des paysans « nouvelle génération » résistent et cassent les codes



#agriculture #transition #new-generation #alternatives

 
How money alters mindset and destroys societies - Wie Geld Gemeinschaft zerstört - Die Kung Story

https://youtu.be/cTk-cRvZRXE

Immagine/foto
John Yellen

English:



The trabe of the Kung live in the Kalahari desert in Namibia – anthropologist John Yellen made that the Kung are probably the most conservative people in the world.

Their tools of stone, wood and bone had not changed in 40,000 years – also not their settlements.

All the huts were aligned to the center – i.e. everyone could see in the other huts.

They used to cook in front of the hut and everyone saw what the others cooked and was allowed to eat.

If one made a big catch – an antelope or an elephant – they shared this with all the others – not only with their family members.

This way the Kung lived for 40,000 years.

Yellen also studied the Kung in the 60s and 70s.

At the beginning of the 70s, the Namibian government had started to trade with the Kung.

For the first time money came into the community.
Immagine/foto
Not 10 years later everything was different. Suddenly, a family will buy more than she needed and lock it in a box.

The huts would be turned around, so the entrance was facing away from the center to protect from sight.

The cooking was moved inside.

A familiar pattern?

We live in large apartment blocks and don’t even know the name of our neighbor and surely not what he or she is cooking.

For us, this kind of living is normal.Immagine/foto

The Kung have not changed their life in 40,000 years.

From all means to destroy a traditional community – Religion – or violence – money works best.

German:



Der Stammt der Kung lebt in der Wüste Kalahari in Namibia – bei der archäologischen Studie welcher der Anthropologe John Yellen dort machte, dass die Kung vermutlich die konservativsten Menschen auf der Welt sind.

Ihre Werkzeuge aus Stein, Holz und Knochen hatte sich seit 40.000 Jahren nicht verändert. Ebenso wenig wie ihre nomadischen Siedlungen.

Alle Hütten waren zur Mitte hin ausgerichtet – d.h. jeder konnte in die anderen Hütten sehen – gekocht wurde immer vor der Hütte und jeder durfte mit essen.

Wer eine richtig große Beute erlegte – eine Antilope oder einen Elefanten – teilte diese mit allen – nicht nur mit seiner Familie – so lebten die Kung also 40.000 Jahre.

Yellen untersuchte die Kung auch in den 60er und 70er Jahren.

Anfang der 70er Jahre hatte die Namibische Regierung angefangen mit den Kung Handel zu treiben.

Zum ersten mal kam also Geld in die Gemeinschaft.

Keine 10 Jahre später war alles anders. Plötzlich kaufe eine Familie mehr als Sie brauchte und schloss es in einer Kiste ein.

Die Hütten wurden umgedreht, so dass nicht mehr alle zu den anderen hineinsehen konnte und die Hütten standen weiter auseinander.

Gekocht wurde innen.

Das Muster erkennen wir – wir leben in großen Wohnblöcken und wissen nicht mal wie unser Nachbar heißt – und bestimmt nicht was er kocht.

Für uns ist das normal.

So haben sich die Kung also verändert – nach dem ihr Leben 40.000 Jahre lang unverändert geblieben war.

Von allen uns bekannten mitteln eine traditionelle Gemeinschaft zu zerstören – Religion – Gewalt – das sicherste Mittel ist Geld.

The “most primitive” people in the world



… probably not.

https://youtu.be/a_TY-7W6MLw

\#money #alternative #reform #systems #vollgeld #bge #altcoopsys #alternatives #alternativgeld #OsOfSociety #OperatingSystemsOfSociety #SystemPhilosophy #dinero #dollar #euro #yen #rubel #sustainability #resilience #complementary #complementarycurrency #cooperation #monetaryreform #financialreform #financialsystemreform #financialcrisis #mortagecrisis #debtcrisis #suprimecrisis #occupywallsreet #occupyfrankfurt #finance #geldsystem #geldreform #moneysystem #financialsystem #economics #ecologicaleconomics #community #psychology
Originally posted at: http://altcoopsys.org/2017/02/07/how-money-alters-mindset-and-destroys-societies-wie-geld-gemeinschaft-zerstort-die-kung-story/
How money alters mindset and destroys societies – Wie Geld Gemeinschaft zerstört – Die Kung Story

 
How money alters mindset and destroys societies - Wie Geld Gemeinschaft zerstört - Die Kung Story

https://youtu.be/cTk-cRvZRXE

Immagine/foto
John Yellen

English:



The trabe of the Kung live in the Kalahari desert in Namibia – anthropologist John Yellen made that the Kung are probably the most conservative people in the world.

Their tools of stone, wood and bone had not changed in 40,000 years – also not their settlements.

All the huts were aligned to the center – i.e. everyone could see in the other huts.

They used to cook in front of the hut and everyone saw what the others cooked and was allowed to eat.

If one made a big catch – an antelope or an elephant – they shared this with all the others – not only with their family members.

This way the Kung lived for 40,000 years.

Yellen also studied the Kung in the 60s and 70s.

At the beginning of the 70s, the Namibian government had started to trade with the Kung.

For the first time money came into the community.
Immagine/foto
Not 10 years later everything was different. Suddenly, a family will buy more than she needed and lock it in a box.

The huts would be turned around, so the entrance was facing away from the center to protect from sight.

The cooking was moved inside.

A familiar pattern?

We live in large apartment blocks and don’t even know the name of our neighbor and surely not what he or she is cooking.

For us, this kind of living is normal.Immagine/foto

The Kung have not changed their life in 40,000 years.

From all means to destroy a traditional community – Religion – or violence – money works best.

German:



Der Stammt der Kung lebt in der Wüste Kalahari in Namibia – bei der archäologischen Studie welcher der Anthropologe John Yellen dort machte, dass die Kung vermutlich die konservativsten Menschen auf der Welt sind.

Ihre Werkzeuge aus Stein, Holz und Knochen hatte sich seit 40.000 Jahren nicht verändert. Ebenso wenig wie ihre nomadischen Siedlungen.

Alle Hütten waren zur Mitte hin ausgerichtet – d.h. jeder konnte in die anderen Hütten sehen – gekocht wurde immer vor der Hütte und jeder durfte mit essen.

Wer eine richtig große Beute erlegte – eine Antilope oder einen Elefanten – teilte diese mit allen – nicht nur mit seiner Familie – so lebten die Kung also 40.000 Jahre.

Yellen untersuchte die Kung auch in den 60er und 70er Jahren.

Anfang der 70er Jahre hatte die Namibische Regierung angefangen mit den Kung Handel zu treiben.

Zum ersten mal kam also Geld in die Gemeinschaft.

Keine 10 Jahre später war alles anders. Plötzlich kaufe eine Familie mehr als Sie brauchte und schloss es in einer Kiste ein.

Die Hütten wurden umgedreht, so dass nicht mehr alle zu den anderen hineinsehen konnte und die Hütten standen weiter auseinander.

Gekocht wurde innen.

Das Muster erkennen wir – wir leben in großen Wohnblöcken und wissen nicht mal wie unser Nachbar heißt – und bestimmt nicht was er kocht.

Für uns ist das normal.

So haben sich die Kung also verändert – nach dem ihr Leben 40.000 Jahre lang unverändert geblieben war.

Von allen uns bekannten mitteln eine traditionelle Gemeinschaft zu zerstören – Religion – Gewalt – das sicherste Mittel ist Geld.

The “most primitive” people in the world



… probably not.

https://youtu.be/a_TY-7W6MLw

\#money #alternative #reform #systems #vollgeld #bge #altcoopsys #alternatives #alternativgeld #OsOfSociety #OperatingSystemsOfSociety #SystemPhilosophy #dinero #dollar #euro #yen #rubel #sustainability #resilience #complementary #complementarycurrency #cooperation #monetaryreform #financialreform #financialsystemreform #financialcrisis #mortagecrisis #debtcrisis #suprimecrisis #occupywallsreet #occupyfrankfurt #finance #geldsystem #geldreform #moneysystem #financialsystem #economics #ecologicaleconomics #community #psychology
Originally posted at: http://altcoopsys.org/2017/02/07/how-money-alters-mindset-and-destroys-societies-wie-geld-gemeinschaft-zerstort-die-kung-story/
How money alters mindset and destroys societies – Wie Geld Gemeinschaft zerstört – Die Kung Story

 

De la plante à la vente! Quand le bio reprend le contrôle



#agriculture #biologique #alternatives #coopérative #Agribio

 
OffGrid Solar Powered Workstation (Open Source Hardware)

This article is about finding out: What low-power PC with decent performance is best suitable for solar-powered (12v would be nice) Off-Grid-computing while respecting your privacy in an FSF-kind?



i have to admit… i am still in the progress… no finished dito-results, sorry.

But very interesting boards were found, Open Source Hardware is kickstarting!!!

Recommendations:



„Given the current situation, there is no ideal device available that would satisfy all the requirements to fully respect users‘ freedom: hardware freedom is missing and most firmwares, modem operating systems and bootroms are non-free. However, it is possible to choose a device that runs with free bootloaders and a free mobile operating system: Replicant, as well as free applications.

Privacy/security cannot be reliably achieved, but it is possible to get close to it by choosing a device that is not proven to have bad modem isolation, provides a reliable way of deactivating the modem or doesn’t feature any modem at all, in addition to running software that is as free as possible and following some general good advice.“

src: http://www.replicant.us/freedom-privacy-security-issues.php

Can the Raspberry be a „full PC with EXTEME Powersavings“?



maybe yes. but it needs a large binary GPU blop to boot – not OpenSource, not transparent possibly endangering your privacy.




I hope so… i would like to operate it with solar-panels and a 12V Battery! Off-Grid computing! That is why this matters!

DargonBox Pyra






Also interesting:



https://pyra-handheld.com/

Debian?



Immagine/foto

not directly. shittt 😀

Why Richard Stallman would never buy: „The Raspberry Pi boots from its GPU and only non-free software is currently available for the GPU, even starting the machine requires a large (2MB) blob of non-free, unsupportable software“

„Generally, your best bet is to use Raspbian – which is (mostly) Debian armhf rebuilt by members of Debian for the RPi’s ARMv6+VFP2 ARM variant. Raspbian releases usually follow the corresponding Debian release but do deviate in a handful of cases for various reasons.

Be aware that the Raspbian images distributed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation contain additional packages supplied by them including updated versions of some software and the addition of non-free software including Oracle Java and Wolfram Mathematica.“

src: https://wiki.debian.org/RaspberryPi

https://perens.com/blog/2016/04/07/installing-the-native-debian-armhf-architecture-on-raspberry-pi-3-instead-of-raspbian/

The Power – where from?



„The built-in Wireless LAN and Bluetooth and the more powerful processor mean that the Raspberry Pi 3 draws about twice the current of its predecessor when under heavy CPU load (750mA vs 360mA).

Official Powersupply: 5v \* 2A = 10Watts „it’ll keep feeding your Pi the steady 2A it needs for proper performance.“

Unfortunately – it seems like – the Raspberry Pi can not be powered by simply plugin it’s power to a PC’s USB-Port.

„The Raspberry Pi can function on lower current power supplies e.g. 5V @ 1A. However, any excessive use of the USB ports or even heavy CPU/GPU loading can cause the voltage to drop, and instability during use. The latest versions of the Raspberry Pi B+/A+/2 have a “low voltage indicator icon” to notify the user if there is a problem with the power.



If you apply power to the USB port when you Pi is off, it will not boot. However, if you apply power to your Pi via one of the standard methods (e.g. the micro USB port), then apply power to USB ports and remove the original supply, it will stay on and functional.

It should be noted that USB ports have a current limit of 500mA, so we would not recommend you attempt to supply more than this via the USB!“

https://www.modmypi.com/blog/how-do-i-power-my-raspberry-pi

Immagine/foto Immagine/foto

src: https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/questions/43285/raspberry-pi-3-vs-pi-2-power-consumption-and-heat-dissipation

https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/raspberry-pi-3-specs-benchmarks/

„Updated following the release of the model B+, A+, Pi 2 Model B, and Pi Zero. According to measurements by Alex Eames [1][2][3][4]“

``` B with keyboard = 1.89 W -> daily 45 Wh
B+ with keyboard = 1.21 W -> daily 29 Wh
B+ with LAN/USB chip off (no i/o except GPIO) = 0.76 W -> daily 18.2 Wh
B+ shut down = 0.26 W -> daily 6.2 Wh
A idle = 0.7 W -> daily 17 Wh
A+ idle = 0.52 W -> daily 12.5 Wh
Pi2 B at idle = 1.15 W -> daily 28 Wh
Pi Zero at idle = 0.51 W -> daily 12.2 Wh

```„The Zero, A+ and B+ really offer huge improvements in the power circuitry. Wow!“

src: https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/questions/5033/how-much-energy-does-the-raspberry-pi-consume-in-a-day

Yeah u guys gonna hate me:

What i really like about JavaScript: It is ALWAYS OpenSource 🙂



and you can produce nice web-based (hardware independent) graphical outputs right on the screen…

but JavaScript is TOO SLOW!



We need more a C-kind of thing, lightweight, client-browser-sandboxed and secure scripting capabilities.

really!

some people like to load a lot of JavaScript on their sites. Combine that with massive not-downscaled pictures of 8MByte and you get a website that crashes every modern IPhone.

so it is really no wonder that a 64Bit-QuadCore, 1GByte embedded System like the Raspberry Pi has it’s problems with: JavaScript

„One of my biggest gripes was how slowly JavaScript-heavy websites loaded, when using both the Epiphany and Iceweasel web browsers. Given JS is so common in modern web sites and services this proved to be problematic.“

src: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/five-tips-for-getting-the-most-out-of-a-raspberry-pi-3-as-a-pc/

So you definitely want to use some light-weight linux like TinyCore Linux (12MByte) and https://noscript.net/

Youtube works! Firefox works! Opera works! 🙂





https://noscript.net/

Next thing: What about Startup of Applications?



„LibreOffice works extremely well taking only 9 seconds to boot with the Raspberry Pi 2.“

src: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/five-tips-for-getting-the-most-out-of-a-raspberry-pi-3-as-a-pc/

Raspi Pros and Cons from an Open Source FSF perspective:



Pros:
  • Large and active community
  • Low price for the capabilities offered
Cons:
  • The Raspberry Pi 1’s processor falls uncomfortably between the processor families that Debian has chosen to target. While Raspbian solves this to some degree an unofficial port will always give less certainty than an official one. (This doesn‘ stand anymore for the Raspberry Pi 2)
  • 3D acceleration is not integrated with X or other standard mechanisms and the Raspberry Pi Foundation don’t seem to show any interest in doing so. Therefore 3D applications will require Pi specific builds.
  • A binary blob used by the GPU must be present on the SD card for the system to boot.
  • While some hardware documentation has been released the documentation is sorely lacking.
  • While schematics are available the board design is closed and the main processor is not available for purchase by the general public.

EOMA68 – crowd funded OpenHardware project:



„The project is being developed by Luke Kenneth Casson Leighton of Rhombus-Tech and is sponsored by Christopher Waid of ThinkPenguin, a company that sells multiple RYF-certified hardware products. It is exciting to see passionate free software advocates in our community working with OEMs to produce a computer hardware product capable of achieving RYF certification. We hope that this is the first of many computing systems they are able to design and build that respect your freedom.

The Libre Tea Computer Card is built with an Allwinner A20 dual core processor configured to use the main CPU for graphics; it has 2 GB of RAM and 8 GB of NAND Flash; and it will come pre-installed with Parabola GNU/Linux-libre, an FSF-endorsed fully-free operating system.“NEWS and PROGRESS

https://archive.fosdem.org/2016/schedule/event/why_libre_hardware/

https://liliputing.com/2016/01/interview-with-eoma68-libre-laptop-developer-luke-kenneth-casson-leighton.html

http://elinux.org/images/9/9e/Eoma68.pdf





https://wiki.debian.org/OpenSourceHardware

https://www.facebook.com/luke.k.leighton A number of similar boards are available, generally at slightly higher prices but also usually with more powerful processors. Some examples are given below, more can be found in the FreedomBox targetted hardware list.

Immagine/foto

also check out: http://www.hardkernel.com/main/
  • ODROID-C1 Amlogic S805 (4× Cortex-A5 @ 1.5 GHz, Mali-450), $35 (most directly Pi-alike)
    • The ODROID-C2 is a 64-bit quad-core single board computer(SBC) that is one of the most cost-effective 64bit development boards available in the ARM world. It can function as a home theater set-top box, a general purpose computer for web browsing, gaming and socializing, a compact tool for college or office work, a prototyping device for hardware tinkering, a controller for home automation, a workstation for software development, and much more.Some of the modern operating systems that run on the ODROID-C2 are Ubuntu, Android, ARCHLinux, Debian, with thousands of free open-source software packages available. The ODROID-C2 is an ARM device — the most advanced architecture for mobile devices and embedded 64-bit computing. The ARM processor’s small size, reduced complexity and low power consumption makes it very suitable for miniaturized devices such as wearables and embedded controllers.
    • \* Amlogic ARM® Cortex®-A53(ARMv8) 1.5Ghz quad core CPUs
      \* Mali™-450 GPU (3 Pixel-processors + 2 Vertex shader processors)
      * 2Gbyte DDR3 SDRAM
      \* Gigabit Ethernet
      \* HDMI 2.0 4K/60Hz display
      \* H.265 4K/60FPS and H.264 4K/30FPS capable VPU
      \* 40pin GPIOs + 7pin I2S
      \* eMMC5.0 HS400 Flash Storage slot / UHS-1 SDR50 MicroSD Card slot
      \* USB 2.0 Host x 4, USB OTG x 1 (power + data capable)
      \* Infrared(IR) Receiver
      \* Ubuntu 16.04 or Android 5.1 Lollipop based on Kernel 3.14LTS
    • Getting started: [url=http://odroid.com/dokuwiki/doku.php]http://odroid.com/dokuwiki/doku.php[/url]
    • STORE in Local : check it HERE
  • Cubieboard Allwinner A10 (Cortex A8, Mali400), $49
  • Banana Pi Allwinner A20 1GHz ARM Cortex-A7 Dual-Core, Pi-like improved, $45
  • Olimex OLinuxIno WIFI Cortex A8, €55
  • EOMA68 modules (Sampling March 2013, so not in full production yet), Allwinner A10 (Cortex A8, Mali400)
  • Beaglebone black omap3, $45
  • OlinuxIno Mini imx233 (ARM926, i.e Debian armel), €35
src: https://wiki.debian.org/RaspberryPi

Promising



Upcoming devices looking promising, but not yet available for general sale. \#raspberry #hardware #linux #raspberrypi #pi #embedded #energy #lowpower #computing #offgrid #solar #12v #alternatives #javascript #fsf #OpenHardware #privacy #openhardware
Originally posted at: http://dwaves.de/2016/11/05/offgrid-solar-powered-workstation-open-source-hardware/
OffGrid Solar Powered Workstation (Open Source Hardware)

 
OffGrid Solar Powered Workstation (Open Source Hardware)

This article is about finding out: What low-power PC with decent performance is best suitable for solar-powered (12v would be nice) Off-Grid-computing while respecting your privacy in an FSF-kind?



i have to admit… i am still in the progress… no finished dito-results, sorry.

But very interesting boards were found, Open Source Hardware is kickstarting!!!

Recommendations:



„Given the current situation, there is no ideal device available that would satisfy all the requirements to fully respect users‘ freedom: hardware freedom is missing and most firmwares, modem operating systems and bootroms are non-free. However, it is possible to choose a device that runs with free bootloaders and a free mobile operating system: Replicant, as well as free applications.

Privacy/security cannot be reliably achieved, but it is possible to get close to it by choosing a device that is not proven to have bad modem isolation, provides a reliable way of deactivating the modem or doesn’t feature any modem at all, in addition to running software that is as free as possible and following some general good advice.“

src: http://www.replicant.us/freedom-privacy-security-issues.php

Can the Raspberry be a „full PC with EXTEME Powersavings“?



maybe yes. but it needs a large binary GPU blop to boot – not OpenSource, not transparent possibly endangering your privacy.




I hope so… i would like to operate it with solar-panels and a 12V Battery! Off-Grid computing! That is why this matters!

DargonBox Pyra






Also interesting:



https://pyra-handheld.com/

Debian?



Immagine/foto

not directly. shittt 😀

Why Richard Stallman would never buy: „The Raspberry Pi boots from its GPU and only non-free software is currently available for the GPU, even starting the machine requires a large (2MB) blob of non-free, unsupportable software“

„Generally, your best bet is to use Raspbian – which is (mostly) Debian armhf rebuilt by members of Debian for the RPi’s ARMv6+VFP2 ARM variant. Raspbian releases usually follow the corresponding Debian release but do deviate in a handful of cases for various reasons.

Be aware that the Raspbian images distributed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation contain additional packages supplied by them including updated versions of some software and the addition of non-free software including Oracle Java and Wolfram Mathematica.“

src: https://wiki.debian.org/RaspberryPi

https://perens.com/blog/2016/04/07/installing-the-native-debian-armhf-architecture-on-raspberry-pi-3-instead-of-raspbian/

The Power – where from?



„The built-in Wireless LAN and Bluetooth and the more powerful processor mean that the Raspberry Pi 3 draws about twice the current of its predecessor when under heavy CPU load (750mA vs 360mA).

Official Powersupply: 5v \* 2A = 10Watts „it’ll keep feeding your Pi the steady 2A it needs for proper performance.“

Unfortunately – it seems like – the Raspberry Pi can not be powered by simply plugin it’s power to a PC’s USB-Port.

„The Raspberry Pi can function on lower current power supplies e.g. 5V @ 1A. However, any excessive use of the USB ports or even heavy CPU/GPU loading can cause the voltage to drop, and instability during use. The latest versions of the Raspberry Pi B+/A+/2 have a “low voltage indicator icon” to notify the user if there is a problem with the power.



If you apply power to the USB port when you Pi is off, it will not boot. However, if you apply power to your Pi via one of the standard methods (e.g. the micro USB port), then apply power to USB ports and remove the original supply, it will stay on and functional.

It should be noted that USB ports have a current limit of 500mA, so we would not recommend you attempt to supply more than this via the USB!“

https://www.modmypi.com/blog/how-do-i-power-my-raspberry-pi

Immagine/foto Immagine/foto

src: https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/questions/43285/raspberry-pi-3-vs-pi-2-power-consumption-and-heat-dissipation

https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/raspberry-pi-3-specs-benchmarks/

„Updated following the release of the model B+, A+, Pi 2 Model B, and Pi Zero. According to measurements by Alex Eames [1][2][3][4]“

``` B with keyboard = 1.89 W -> daily 45 Wh
B+ with keyboard = 1.21 W -> daily 29 Wh
B+ with LAN/USB chip off (no i/o except GPIO) = 0.76 W -> daily 18.2 Wh
B+ shut down = 0.26 W -> daily 6.2 Wh
A idle = 0.7 W -> daily 17 Wh
A+ idle = 0.52 W -> daily 12.5 Wh
Pi2 B at idle = 1.15 W -> daily 28 Wh
Pi Zero at idle = 0.51 W -> daily 12.2 Wh

```„The Zero, A+ and B+ really offer huge improvements in the power circuitry. Wow!“

src: https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/questions/5033/how-much-energy-does-the-raspberry-pi-consume-in-a-day

Yeah u guys gonna hate me:

What i really like about JavaScript: It is ALWAYS OpenSource 🙂



and you can produce nice web-based (hardware independent) graphical outputs right on the screen…

but JavaScript is TOO SLOW!



We need more a C-kind of thing, lightweight, client-browser-sandboxed and secure scripting capabilities.

really!

some people like to load a lot of JavaScript on their sites. Combine that with massive not-downscaled pictures of 8MByte and you get a website that crashes every modern IPhone.

so it is really no wonder that a 64Bit-QuadCore, 1GByte embedded System like the Raspberry Pi has it’s problems with: JavaScript

„One of my biggest gripes was how slowly JavaScript-heavy websites loaded, when using both the Epiphany and Iceweasel web browsers. Given JS is so common in modern web sites and services this proved to be problematic.“

src: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/five-tips-for-getting-the-most-out-of-a-raspberry-pi-3-as-a-pc/

So you definitely want to use some light-weight linux like TinyCore Linux (12MByte) and https://noscript.net/

Youtube works! Firefox works! Opera works! 🙂





https://noscript.net/

Next thing: What about Startup of Applications?



„LibreOffice works extremely well taking only 9 seconds to boot with the Raspberry Pi 2.“

src: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/five-tips-for-getting-the-most-out-of-a-raspberry-pi-3-as-a-pc/

Raspi Pros and Cons from an Open Source FSF perspective:



Pros:
  • Large and active community
  • Low price for the capabilities offered
Cons:
  • The Raspberry Pi 1’s processor falls uncomfortably between the processor families that Debian has chosen to target. While Raspbian solves this to some degree an unofficial port will always give less certainty than an official one. (This doesn‘ stand anymore for the Raspberry Pi 2)
  • 3D acceleration is not integrated with X or other standard mechanisms and the Raspberry Pi Foundation don’t seem to show any interest in doing so. Therefore 3D applications will require Pi specific builds.
  • A binary blob used by the GPU must be present on the SD card for the system to boot.
  • While some hardware documentation has been released the documentation is sorely lacking.
  • While schematics are available the board design is closed and the main processor is not available for purchase by the general public.

EOMA68 – crowd funded OpenHardware project:



„The project is being developed by Luke Kenneth Casson Leighton of Rhombus-Tech and is sponsored by Christopher Waid of ThinkPenguin, a company that sells multiple RYF-certified hardware products. It is exciting to see passionate free software advocates in our community working with OEMs to produce a computer hardware product capable of achieving RYF certification. We hope that this is the first of many computing systems they are able to design and build that respect your freedom.

The Libre Tea Computer Card is built with an Allwinner A20 dual core processor configured to use the main CPU for graphics; it has 2 GB of RAM and 8 GB of NAND Flash; and it will come pre-installed with Parabola GNU/Linux-libre, an FSF-endorsed fully-free operating system.“NEWS and PROGRESS

https://archive.fosdem.org/2016/schedule/event/why_libre_hardware/

https://liliputing.com/2016/01/interview-with-eoma68-libre-laptop-developer-luke-kenneth-casson-leighton.html

http://elinux.org/images/9/9e/Eoma68.pdf





https://wiki.debian.org/OpenSourceHardware

https://www.facebook.com/luke.k.leighton A number of similar boards are available, generally at slightly higher prices but also usually with more powerful processors. Some examples are given below, more can be found in the FreedomBox targetted hardware list.

Immagine/foto

also check out: http://www.hardkernel.com/main/
  • ODROID-C1 Amlogic S805 (4× Cortex-A5 @ 1.5 GHz, Mali-450), $35 (most directly Pi-alike)
    • The ODROID-C2 is a 64-bit quad-core single board computer(SBC) that is one of the most cost-effective 64bit development boards available in the ARM world. It can function as a home theater set-top box, a general purpose computer for web browsing, gaming and socializing, a compact tool for college or office work, a prototyping device for hardware tinkering, a controller for home automation, a workstation for software development, and much more.Some of the modern operating systems that run on the ODROID-C2 are Ubuntu, Android, ARCHLinux, Debian, with thousands of free open-source software packages available. The ODROID-C2 is an ARM device — the most advanced architecture for mobile devices and embedded 64-bit computing. The ARM processor’s small size, reduced complexity and low power consumption makes it very suitable for miniaturized devices such as wearables and embedded controllers.
    • \* Amlogic ARM® Cortex®-A53(ARMv8) 1.5Ghz quad core CPUs
      \* Mali™-450 GPU (3 Pixel-processors + 2 Vertex shader processors)
      * 2Gbyte DDR3 SDRAM
      \* Gigabit Ethernet
      \* HDMI 2.0 4K/60Hz display
      \* H.265 4K/60FPS and H.264 4K/30FPS capable VPU
      \* 40pin GPIOs + 7pin I2S
      \* eMMC5.0 HS400 Flash Storage slot / UHS-1 SDR50 MicroSD Card slot
      \* USB 2.0 Host x 4, USB OTG x 1 (power + data capable)
      \* Infrared(IR) Receiver
      \* Ubuntu 16.04 or Android 5.1 Lollipop based on Kernel 3.14LTS
    • Getting started: [url=http://odroid.com/dokuwiki/doku.php]http://odroid.com/dokuwiki/doku.php[/url]
    • STORE in Local : check it HERE
  • Cubieboard Allwinner A10 (Cortex A8, Mali400), $49
  • Banana Pi Allwinner A20 1GHz ARM Cortex-A7 Dual-Core, Pi-like improved, $45
  • Olimex OLinuxIno WIFI Cortex A8, €55
  • EOMA68 modules (Sampling March 2013, so not in full production yet), Allwinner A10 (Cortex A8, Mali400)
  • Beaglebone black omap3, $45
  • OlinuxIno Mini imx233 (ARM926, i.e Debian armel), €35
src: https://wiki.debian.org/RaspberryPi

Promising



Upcoming devices looking promising, but not yet available for general sale. \#raspberry #hardware #linux #raspberrypi #pi #embedded #energy #lowpower #computing #offgrid #solar #12v #alternatives #javascript #fsf #OpenHardware #privacy #openhardware
Originally posted at: http://dwaves.de/2016/11/05/offgrid-solar-powered-workstation-open-source-hardware/
OffGrid Solar Powered Workstation (Open Source Hardware)

 
Bernard Lietaer Vision der Zukunft ehemaliger ZentralBanker Belgiens - Wir werden gezwungen sein unser Geldsystem bis 2020 zu reformieren

https://youtu.be/wCPSduKJfE4

Bernard Lietaer (ehemaliger ZentralBanker Belgiens) Vision der Zukunft:

Wir werden gezwungen sein unser Geldsystem bis 2020 zu reformieren.

“The Economist” prophezeit eine (vermutlich rein digitale) Weltwährung – leider leider leider könnte uns das so verkauft werden wie den Euro – dass alles besser wird… eine tolle Idee… aber ist diese auch ehrlich gemeint und designed? Oder wiegen die Interessen einiger weniger Egoisten und deren Macht-Sucht wiedermal befriedigt werden muss mehr?

Man muss beim Lietaer Ansatz unterscheiden – er möchte eine Biodiversität an verschiedenen sich ergänzenden Währungen – ein Ökosystem – welches sich auch expandieren und exportieren und skalieren lässt – aber vermutlich keine einzelne alles dominierenden Welt-Währung…





Immagine/fotoImmagine/fotoImmagine/fotoImmagine/foto

Immagine/foto
The Rise of the Phoenix world currency from the ashes of national fiat currencies ie. destruction of fiat currencies via hyperinflation. “Phoenix” is of course an occult metaphor. Out of the destruction, the ashes of the old world order, the Luciferian New World Order will rise like a Phoenix!

download article: ArticleEconomist1988GetReadyforthePhoenix_001.pdf
COVER: “GET READY FOR A WORLD CURRENCY”
Title of article: Get Ready for the Phoenix
Source: Economist; 01/9/88, Vol. 306, pp 9-10
THIRTY years from now, Americans, Japanese, Europeans, and people in many other rich countries, and some relatively poor ones will probably be paying for their shopping with the same currency. Prices will be quoted not in dollars, yen or D-marks but in, let’s say, the phoenix. The phoenix will be favoured by companies and shoppers because it will be more convenient than today’s national currencies, which by then will seem a quaint cause of much disruption to economic life in the last twentieth century.

At the beginning of 1988 this appears an outlandish prediction. Proposals for eventual monetary union proliferated five and ten years ago, but they hardly envisaged the setbacks of 1987. The governments of the big economies tried to move an inch or two towards a more managed system of exchange rates – a logical preliminary, it might seem, to radical monetary reform. For lack of co-operation in their underlying economic policies they bungled it horribly, and provoked the rise in interest rates that brought on the stock market crash of October. These events have chastened exchange-rate reformers. The market crash taught them that the pretence of policy co-operation can be worse than nothing, and that until real co-operation is feasible (i.e., until governments surrender some economic sovereignty) further attempts to peg currencies will flounder.

The new world economy
The biggest change in the world economy since the early 1970’s is that flows of money have replaced trade in goods as the force that drives exchange rates. as a result of the relentless integration of the world’s financial markets, differences in national economic policies can disturb interest rates (or expectations of future interest rates) only slightly, yet still call forth huge transfers of financial assets from one country to another. These transfers swamp the flow of trade revenues in their effect on the demand and supply for different currencies, and hence in their effect on exchange rates. As telecommunications technology continues to advance, these transactions will be cheaper and faster still. With unco-ordinated economic policies, currencies can get only more volatile.
….
In all these ways national economic boundaries are slowly dissolving. As the trend continues, the appeal of a currency union across at least the main industrial countries will seem irresistible to everybody except foreign-exchange traders and governments. In the phoenix zone, economic adjustment to shifts in relative prices would happen smoothly and automatically, rather as it does today between different regions within large economies (a brief on pages 74-75 explains how.) The absence of all currency risk would spur trade, investment and employment (not).

The phoenix zone would impose tight constraints on national governments. There would be no such thing, for instance, as a national monetary policy. The world phoenix supply would be fixed by a new central bank, descended perhaps from the IMF. The world inflation rate – and hence, within narrow margins, each national inflation rate- would be in its charge. Each country could use taxes and public spending to offset temporary falls in demand, but it would have to borrow rather than print money to finance its budget deficit. With no recourse to the inflation tax, governments and their creditors would be forced to judge their borrowing and lending plans more carefully than they do today. This means a big loss of economic sovereignty, but the trends that make the phoenix so appealing are taking that sovereignty away in any case. Even in a world of more-or-less floating exchange rates, individual governments have seen their policy independence checked by an unfriendly outside world.

As the next century approaches, the natural forces that are pushing the world towards economic integration will offer governments a broad choice. They can go with the flow, or they can build barricades. Preparing the way for the phoenix will mean fewer pretended agreements on policy and more real ones. It will mean allowing and then actively promoting the private-sector use of an international money alongside existing national monies. That would let people vote with their wallets for the eventual move to full currency union. The phoenix would probably start as a cocktail of national currencies, just as the Special Drawing Right is today. In time, though, its value against national currencies would cease to matter, because people would choose it for its convenience and the stability of its purchasing power.
…..
The alternative – to preserve policymaking autonomy- would involve a new proliferation of truly draconian controls on trade and capital flows. This course offers governments a splendid time. They could manage exchange-rate movements, deploy monetary and fiscal policy without inhibition, and tackle the resulting bursts of inflation with prices and incomes polices. It is a growth-crippling prospect. Pencil in the phoenix for around 2018, and welcome it when it comes. (not)

http://www.economist.com/

https://endtimeobserver.blogspot.de/2009/09/flashback-1988-economist-magazine-get.html

On this blog we’ve made frequent mention of late for the drive toward a new world economic order, including the push for a singular world currency.

However, it’s worth noting that it’s not just Christian prophecy-watchers and so-called “conspiracy nuts” who have long been watching for the emergence of a world currency. Twenty-one years ago, The Economist magazine spoke of the coming world currency, which they named “the phoenix”.

To the skeptics, all this talk of a coming new world order, one world government, and the Antichrist all sounds like silly talk. I’m sure when Noah warned the world of the flood to come, that sounded like silly talk too.

… until the rain started to fall.

————————–

COVER: “GET READY FOR A WORLD CURRENCY”
Title of article: Get Ready for the Phoenix
Source: Economist; 01/9/88, Vol. 306, pp 9-10

From the article:

“THIRTY years from now, Americans, Japanese, Europeans, and people in many other rich countries, and some relatively poor ones will probably be paying for their shopping with the same currency. Prices will be quoted not in dollars, yen or D-marks but in, let’s say, the phoenix. The phoenix will be favoured by companies and shoppers because it will be more convenient than today’s national currencies, which by then will seem a quaint cause of much disruption to economic life in the last twentieth century.

At the beginning of 1988 this appears an outlandish prediction. Proposals for eventual monetary union proliferated five and ten years ago, but they hardly envisaged the setbacks of 1987.”

(Note: the writer is apparently referring here to the events related to October 19, 1987 — often referred to as “Black Monday”– when stock markets crashed in the U.S. and around the world, shedding a huge value in a very short time.)

another quote…

” As the next century approaches, the natural forces that are pushing the world towards economic integration will offer governments a broad choice. They can go with the flow, or they can build barricades. Preparing the way for the phoenix will mean fewer pretended agreements on policy and more real ones. It will mean allowing and then actively promoting the private-sector use of an international money alongside existing national monies. That would let people vote with their wallets for the eventual move to full currency union. The phoenix would probably start as a cocktail of national currencies, just as the Special Drawing Right is today. In time, though, its value against national currencies would cease to matter, because people would choose it for its convenience and the stability of its purchasing power.”

Full article here.

Links Related;



http://www.singleglobalcurrency.org/documents/ArticleEconomist1988GetReadyforthePhoenix_001.doc

Related Content:



Coming Soon:
A Global Central Bank, Global Currency & World Government

© By ANDREW MARSHALL

Following the 2009 G20 summit, plans were announced for implementing the creation of a new global currency to replace the US dollar’s role as the world reserve currency. Point 19 of the communiqué released by the G20 at the end of the Summit stated, “We have agreed to support a general SDR allocation which will inject $250 billion into the world economy and increase global liquidity.” SDRs, or Special Drawing Rights, are “a synthetic paper currency issued by the International Monetary Fund.”

As the Telegraph reported, “the G20 leaders have activated the IMF’s power to create money and begin global ‘quantitative easing’. In doing so, they are putting a de facto world currency into play. It is outside the control of any sovereign body. Conspiracy theorists will love it.”1
The article continued in stating that, “there is now a world currency in waiting. In time, SDRs are likely to evolve into a parking place for the foreign holdings of central banks, led by the People’s Bank of China.” Further, “the creation of a Financial Stability Board looks like the first step towards a global financial regulator,” or, in other words, a global central bank.
It is important to take a closer look at these “solutions” being proposed and implemented in the midst of the current global financial crisis. These are not new suggestions, as they have been in the plans of the global elite for a long time. However, in the midst of the current crisis, the elite have fast-tracked their agenda of forging a New World Order in finance. It is important to address the background to these proposed and imposed “solutions” and what effects they will have on the International Monetary System (IMS) and the global political economy as a whole.

A New Bretton-Woods

In October of 2008, Gordon Brown, Prime Minister of the UK, said that we “must have a new Bretton Woods – building a new international financial architecture for the years ahead.” He continued in saying that, “we must now reform the international financial system,” and that he would want “to see the IMF reformed to become a ‘global central bank’ closely monitoring the international economy and financial system.”2
On October 17, 2008, Gordon Brown wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post in which he said that this ‘new Bretton-Woods’ should work towards “global governance,” and implementing “shared global standards for accounting and regulation,” and “the renewal of our international institutions to make them effective early-warning systems for the world economy.”3
In early October 2008, it was reported that, “as the world’s central bankers gather this week in Washington DC for an IMF-World Bank conference to discuss the crisis, the big question they face is whether it is time to establish a global economic ‘policeman’ to ensure the crash of 2008 can never be repeated.” Further, “any organisation with the power to police the global economy would have to include representatives of every major country – a United Nations of economic regulation.” A former governor of the Bank of England suggested that, “the answer might already be staring us in the face, in the form of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS),” however, “the problem is that it has no teeth. The IMF tends to couch its warnings about economic problems in very diplomatic language, but the BIS is more independent and much better placed to deal with this if it is given the power to do so.”4

Emergence of Regional Currencies

On January 1, 1999, the European Union established the Euro as its regional currency. The Euro has grown in prominence over the past several years. However, it is not to be the only regional currency in the world. There are moves and calls for other regional currencies throughout the world.
In 2007, Foreign Affairs, the journal of the Council on Foreign Relations, ran an article titled, ‘The End of National Currency’, in which it began by discussing the volatility of international currency markets, and that very few “real” solutions have been proposed to address successive currency crises.
The author poses the question, “Will restoring lost sovereignty to governments put an end to financial instability?” He answers by stating that, “this is a dangerous misdiagnosis,” and that, “the right course is not to return to a mythical past of monetary sovereignty, with governments controlling local interest and exchange rates in blissful ignorance of the rest of the world. Governments must let go of the fatal notion that nationhood requires them to make and control the money used in their territory. National currencies and global markets simply do not mix; together they make a deadly brew of currency crises and geopolitical tension and create ready pretexts for damaging protectionism. In order to globalise safely, countries should abandon monetary nationalism and abolish unwanted currencies, the source of much of today’s instability.”
The author explains that, “monetary nationalism is simply incompatible with globalisation. It has always been, even if this has only become apparent since the 1970s, when all the world’s governments rendered their currencies intrinsically worthless.” The author states that, “since economic development outside the process of globalisation is no longer possible, countries should abandon monetary nationalism. Governments should replace national currencies with the dollar or the euro or, in the case of Asia, collaborate to produce a new multinational currency over a comparably large and economically diversified area.” Essentially, according to the author, the solution lies in regional currencies.5
In October of 2008, “European Central Bank council member Ewald Nowotny said a ‘tri-polar’ global currency system is developing between Asia, Europe and the US and that he’s skeptical the US dollar’s centrality can be revived.”6
In South America, there are moves to create a regional currency and central bank under the Union of South American Nations, which was established in May of 2008.7,8 The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), a regional trade bloc of Arabic Gulf nations, has also been making moves towards creating a regional central bank and common currency for its member nations, following the example of Europe, and even being advised by the European Central Bank.9-12
From the time of the East Asian financial crisis in the late 1990s, there have been calls for the creation of a regional currency for East Asia among the ten member nations of the ASEAN bloc, as well as China, Japan and South Korea. In 2008, ASEAN central bank officials and financial ministers met to discuss monetary integration in the region.13-19
Within Africa, there are already certain regional monetary unions, and within the framework of the African Union, there are moves being implemented to create an African currency under the control of an African Central Bank (ACB), which is to be located in Nigeria.20-24
In North America, there are moves, coinciding with the deepening economic and political integration of the continent under NAFTA and the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America (SPP), to create a regional currency for North America, aptly given the current designation as the Amero, and even the then-Governor of the Central Bank of Canada, David Dodge, in 2007, said that a regional currency was “possible.”25-33

A Global Currency

In 1988, The Economist ran an article titled, ‘Get Ready for the Phoenix’, in which they wrote, “thirty years from now, Americans, Japanese, Europeans, and people in many other rich countries and some relatively poor ones will probably be paying for their shopping with the same currency. Prices will be quoted not in dollars, yen or D-marks but in, let’s say, the phoenix. The phoenix will be favoured by companies and shoppers because it will be more convenient than today’s national currencies, which by then will seem a quaint cause of much disruption to economic life in the late twentieth century.”
The article stated that, “The market crash [of 1987] taught [governments]that the pretence of policy cooperation can be worse than nothing, and that until real co-operation is feasible (ie, until governments surrender some economic sovereignty) further attempts to peg currencies will flounder.”
Amazingly the author of the article adds that, “Several more big exchange-rate upsets, a few more stockmarket crashes and probably a slump or two will be needed before politicians are willing to face squarely up to that choice. This points to a muddled sequence of emergency followed by patch-up followed by emergency, stretching out far beyond 2018 – except for two things. As time passes, the damage caused by currency instability is gradually going to mount; and the very trends that will make it mount are making the utopia of monetary union feasible.”
The article advocated the formation of a global central bank, perhaps through the IMF, and “this means a big loss of economic sovereignty, but the trends that make the phoenix so appealing are taking that sovereignty away in any case.”
The article concludes in stating that, “The phoenix would probably start as a cocktail of national currencies, just as the Special Drawing Right is today. In time, though, its value against national currencies would cease to matter, because people would choose it for its convenience and the stability of its purchasing power.” The last sentence says, “Pencil in the phoenix for around 2018, and welcome it when it comes.”34
Former US Federal Reserve Governor Paul Volcker has said that, “if we are to have a truly global economy, a single world currency makes sense.” A European Central Bank executive stated that, “we might one day have a single world currency,” in “a step towards the ideal situation of a fully integrated world.”35
The IMF held a conference in 2000 discussing how the world was segmenting into regional currency blocs and that a single world currency was possible, and that it is, in fact, preferable.36 Nobel Prize winning economist Robert Mundell has long advocated the creation of a global currency, and that it “would restore a needed coherence to the international monetary system, give the International Monetary Fund a function that would help it to promote stability, and be a catalyst for international harmony.”37
In March 2009, Russia suggested that the G20 meeting in April should “consider the possibility of creating a supra-national reserve currency or a ‘super-reserve currency’,” and to consider the IMF’s Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) in this capacity.38 A week later, China’s central bank governor proposed the creation of a global currency controlled by the IMF, replacing the US dollar as the world reserve currency, also using the IMF’s SDRs as the reserve currency basket against which all other currencies would be fixed.39
Days after this proposal, the US Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, former President of the New York Federal Reserve Bank, told the Council on Foreign Relations that, in response to a question about the Chinese proposal, “we’re actually quite open to that suggestion. But you should think of it as rather evolutionary, building on the current architectures, than – rather than – rather than moving us to global monetary union.”40
In late March a UN panel of economists recommended the creation of a new global currency reserve that would replace the US dollar, and that it would be an “independently administered reserve currency.”41

Creating a World Central Bank

In 1998, Jeffrey Garten wrote an article for the New York Times advocating a “global Fed.” Garten was former Dean of the Yale School of Management, former Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade in the Clinton administration, previously served on the White House Council on International Economic Policy under the Nixon administration and on the policy planning staffs of Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and Cyrus Vance of the Ford and Carter administrations, former Managing Director at Lehman Brothers, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
In his article written in 1998, he stated that, “over time the United States set up crucial central institutions – the Securities and Exchange Commission (1933), the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (1934) and, most important, the Federal Reserve (1913). In so doing, America became a managed national economy. These organisations were created to make capitalism work, to prevent destructive business cycles and to moderate the harsh, invisible hand of Adam Smith.” He stated that, “this is what now must occur on a global scale. The world needs an institution that has a hand on the economic rudder when the seas become stormy. It needs a global central bank.”
Interestingly, Garten states that, “one thing that would not be acceptable would be for the bank to be at the mercy of short-term-oriented legislatures.” In essence, it is not to be accountable to the people of the world. So, he asks the question, “To whom would a global central bank be accountable? It would have too much power to be governed only by technocrats, although it must be led by the best of them. One possibility would be to link the new bank to an enlarged Group of Seven – perhaps a ‘G-15’ [or in today’s context, the G20] that would include the G-7 plus rotating members like Mexico, Brazil, South Africa, Poland, India, China and South Korea.” He further states that, “There would have to be very close collaboration” between the global bank and the Fed.42
In September of 2008, Jeffrey Garten wrote an article for the Financial Times in which he stated that, “Even if the US’s massive financial rescue operation succeeds, it should be followed by something even more far-reaching – the establishment of a Global Monetary Authority to oversee markets that have become borderless.”
In late October of 2008, Garten wrote an article for Newsweek in which he stated that, “leaders should begin laying the groundwork for establishing a global central bank.” He explained that, “there was a time when the US Federal Reserve played this role [as governing financial authority of the world], as the prime financial institution of the world’s most powerful economy, overseeing the one global currency. But with the growth of capital markets, the rise of currencies like the euro and the emergence of powerful players such as China, the shift of wealth to Asia and the Persian Gulf and, of course, the deep-seated problems in the American economy itself, the Fed no longer has the capability to lead single-handedly.”43
In January of 2009, it was reported that, “one clear solution to avoid a repeat of the problems would be the establishment of a ‘global central bank’ – with the IMF and World Bank being unable to prevent the financial meltdown.” Dr. William Overholt, senior research fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School, formerly with the Rand Institute, gave a speech in Dubai in which he said that, “To avoid another crisis, we need an ability to manage global liquidity. Theoretically that could be achieved through some kind of global central bank, or through the creation of a global currency, or through global acceptance of a set of rules with sanctions and a dispute settlement mechanism.”44

A “New World Order” in Banking

In June of 2008, before he was Treasury Secretary in the Obama administration, Timothy Geithner, as head of the New York Federal Reserve, wrote an article for the Financial Times following his attendance at the 2008 Bilderberg conference, in which he said that, “banks and investment banks whose health is crucial to the global financial system should operate under a unified regulatory framework,” and that, “the US Federal Reserve should play a ‘central role’ in the new regulatory framework, working closely with supervisors in the US and around the world.”45
In November of 2008, The National, a prominent United Arab Emirates newspaper, reported on Baron David de Rothschild accompanying UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown on a visit to the Middle East, although not as a “part of the official party” accompanying Brown. Following an interview with the Baron, it was reported that, “Rothschild shares most people’s view that there is a new world order. In his opinion, banks will deleverage and there will be a new form of global governance.”46
In February of 2009, the Times Online reported that a “new world order in banking [is]necessary,” and that, “it is increasingly evident that the world needs a new banking system and that it should not bear much resemblance to the one that has failed so spectacularly.”47
But of course, the elites that are shaping this new banking system are the champions of the previous banking system. The solutions that will follow are simply the extensions of the current system, only sped up through the necessity posed by the current crisis.

An Emerging Global Government

An April 3, 2009 article in the Toronto Star, reported that the G20 “confab constitutes the first great get-together of the new world order. This geopolitical order may follow a number of directions, by no means all of them pleasant. But its defining characteristic is already unchangeable.” Further, “An uncomfortable characteristic of the new world order may well turn out to be that global income gaps will widen because the rising powers, such as China, India and Brazil, regard those below them on the ladder as potential rivals.” The author further states that, “The new world order thus won’t necessarily be any better than the old one,” and that, “what is certain, though, is that global affairs are going to be considerably different from now on.”48
David Rothkopf, a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, former Deputy Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade in the Clinton administration, and former managing director of Kissinger and Associates, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, recently wrote a book titled, Superclass: The Global Power Elite and the World They are Making, of which he is certainly a member. When discussing the role and agenda of the global “superclass,” he states that, “in a world of global movements and threats that don’t present their passports at national borders, it is no longer possible for a nation-state acting alone to fulfil its portion of the social contract.”49
He writes that “the international organisations and alliances we have today,” are evolving and achieving great things, despite certain flaws, and that he is “optimistic that progress will continue to be made,” but it will be difficult, because it “undercuts many national and local power structures and cultural concepts that have foundations deep in the bedrock of human civilisation, namely the notion of sovereignty.”50 He further notes that, “mechanisms of global governance are more achievable in today’s environment,” and that these mechanisms “are often creative with temporary solutions to urgent problems that cannot wait for the world to embrace a bigger and more controversial idea like real global government.”51
In December of 2008, the Financial Times ran an article written by Gideon Rachman, a past Bilderberg attendee, who wrote that, “for the first time in my life, I think the formation of some sort of world government is plausible,” and that, “a ‘world government’ would involve much more than co-operation between nations. It would be an entity with state-like characteristics, backed by a body of laws. The European Union has already set up a continental government for 27 countries, which could be a model. The EU has a supreme court, a currency, thousands of pages of law, a large civil service and the ability to deploy military force.” Asking if the European model could “go global,” he states that it can, and that this is made possible through an awakening “change in the political atmosphere,” as “the financial crisis and climate change are pushing national governments towards global solutions, even in countries such as China and the US that are traditionally fierce guardians of national sovereignty.”
He quoted an adviser to French President Nicolas Sarkozy as saying, “global governance is just a euphemism for global government,” and that the “core of the international financial crisis is that we have global financial markets and no global rule of law.” However, Rachman states that any push towards a global government “will be a painful, slow process.” He then states that a key problem in this push can be explained with an example from the EU, which “has suffered a series of humiliating defeats in referendums, when plans for ‘ever closer union’ have been referred to the voters. In general, the Union has progressed fastest when far-reaching deals have been agreed by technocrats and politicians – and then pushed through without direct reference to the voters. International governance tends to be effective, only when it is anti-democratic. [Emphasis added]”52
In November of 2008, the United States National Intelligence Council (NIC), the US intelligence community’s “centre for midterm and long-term strategic thinking,” released a report that it produced in collaboration with numerous think tanks, consulting firms, academic institutions and hundreds of other experts, among them are the Atlantic Council of the United States, the Wilson Center, RAND Corporation, the Brookings Institution, American Enterprise Institute, Texas A&M University, the Council on Foreign Relations and Chatham House in London.53
The report, titled Global Trends 2025: A Transformed World, outlines the current global political and economic trends that the world may be going through by the year 2025. In terms of the financial crisis, it states that solving this “will require long-term efforts to establish a new international system.”54 It suggests that as the “China-model” for development becomes increasingly attractive, there may be a “decline in democratisation” for emerging economies, authoritarian regimes, and “weak democracies frustrated by years of economic underperformance.” Further, the dollar will cease to be the global reserve currency, as there would likely be a “move away from the dollar.”55
It states that the dollar will become “something of a first among equals in a basket of currencies by 2025. This could occur suddenly in the wake of a crisis, or gradually with global rebalancing.”56 The report elaborates on the construction of a new international system, stating that, “by 2025, nation-states will no longer be the only – and often not the most important – actors on the world stage and the ‘international system’ will have morphed to accommodate the new reality. But the transformation will be incomplete and uneven.” It also notes that, “most of the pressing transnational problems – including climate change, regulation of globalised financial markets, migration, failing states, crime networks, etc. – are unlikely to be effectively resolved by the actions of individual nation-states. The need for effective global governance will increase faster than existing mechanisms can respond.”57
The report discusses the topic of regionalism, stating that, “Asian regionalism would have global implications, possibly sparking or reinforcing a trend toward three trade and financial clusters that could become quasi-blocs (North America, Europe, and East Asia).” These blocs “would have implications for the ability to achieve future global World Trade Organisation agreements and regional clusters could compete in the setting of trans-regional product standards for IT, biotech, nanotech, intellectual property rights, and other ‘new economy’ products.”58
Reflecting similar assumptions made by Rachman in his article advocating a world government is the topic of democratisation, on which the report says, “advances are likely to slow and globalisation will subject many recently democratised countries to increasing social and economic pressures that could undermine liberal institutions.” This is largely because “the better economic performance of many authoritarian governments could sow doubts among some about democracy as the best form of government. The surveys we consulted indicated that many East Asians put greater emphasis on good management, including increasing standards of livings, than democracy.” Further, “even in many well-established democracies, surveys show growing frustration with the current workings of democratic government and questioning among elites over the ability of democratic governments to take the bold actions necessary to deal rapidly and effectively with the growing number of transnational challenges.”59

The Creation of a New World Order

Ultimately, what this implies is that the future of the global political economy is one of increasing moves toward a global system of governance, or a world government, with a world central bank and global currency; and that, concurrently, these developments are likely to materialise in the face of and as a result of a decline in democracy around the world, and thus, a rise in authoritarianism. What we are witnessing is the creation of a New World Order, controlled by a totalitarian global government structure.
In fact, the very concept of a global currency and global central bank is authoritarian in its very nature, as it removes any vestiges of oversight and accountability away from the people of the world, and toward a small, increasingly interconnected group of international elites.
As Carroll Quigley explained in his monumental book, Tragedy and Hope, “[T]he powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent private meetings and conferences. The apex of the system was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basle, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world’s central banks which were themselves private corporations.”60
Indeed, the current “solutions” being proposed to the global financial crisis benefit those that caused the crisis over those that are poised to suffer the most as a result of the crisis: the disappearing middle classes, the world’s dispossessed, poor, indebted people. The proposed solutions to this crisis represent the manifestations and actualisation of the ultimate generational goals of the global elite; and thus, represent the least favourable conditions for the vast majority of the world’s people.
It is imperative that the world’s people throw their weight against these “solutions” and usher in a new era of world order, one of the People’s World Order; with the solution lying in local governance and local economies, so that the people have greater roles in determining the future and structure of their own political-economy, and thus, their own society. With this alternative of localised political economies, in conjunction with an unprecedented global population and international democratisation of communication through the internet, we have the means and possibility before us to forge the most diverse manifestation of cultures and societies that humanity has ever known.
The answer lies in the individual’s internalisation of human power and destination, and a rejection of the externalisation of power and human destiny to a global authority of which all but a select few people have access to. To internalise human power and destiny is to realise the gift of a human mind, which has the ability to engage in thought beyond the material, such as food and shelter, and venture into the realm of the conceptual. Each individual possesses – within themselves – the ability to think critically about themselves and their own life; now is the time to utilise this ability with the aim of internalising the concepts and questions of human power and destiny: Why are we here? Where are we going? Where should we be going? How do we get there?
The supposed answers to these questions are offered to us by a tiny global elite who fear the repercussions of what would take place if the people of the world were to begin to answer these questions themselves. I do not know the answers to these questions, but I do know that the answers lie in the human mind and spirit, that which has overcome and will continue to overcome the greatest of challenges to humanity, and will, without doubt, triumph over the New World Order.

Footnotes:

1. Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, ‘The G20 moves the world a step closer to a global currency’, The Telegraph, April 3, 2009, www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment/ambroseevans_pritchard/5096524/The-G20-moves-the-world-a-step-closer-to-a-global-currency.html
2. Robert Winnett, ‘Financial Crisis: Gordon Brown calls for “new Bretton Woods”,’ The Telegraph, October 13, 2008, www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financetopics/financialcrisis/3189517/Financial-Crisis-Gordon-Brown-calls-for-new-Bretton-Woods.html
3. Gordon Brown, ‘Out of the Ashes’, The Washington Post, October 17, 2008, www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/10/16/AR2008101603179.html
4. Gordon Rayner, ‘Global financial crisis: does the world need a new banking “policeman”?’, The Telegraph, October 8, 2008, www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financetopics/financialcrisis/3155563/Global-financial-crisis-does-the-world-need-a-new-banking-policeman.html
5. Benn Steil, ‘The End of National Currency’, Foreign Affairs, Vol. 86, Issue 3, May/June 2007, pp.83-96
6. Jonathan Tirone, ‘ECB’s Nowotny Sees Global “Tri-Polar” Currency System Evolving’, Bloomberg, October 19, 2008, www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=apjqJKKQvfDc&refer=home
7. BBC, ‘South America nations found union’, BBC News, May 23, 2008, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7417896.stm
8. CNews, ‘South American nations to seek common currency’, China View, May 26, 2008, http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-05/27/content_8260847.htm
9. AME Info, ‘GCC: Full steam ahead to monetary union’, September 19, 2005, www.ameinfo.com/67925.html
10. John Irish, ‘GCC Agrees on Monetary Union but Signals Delay in Common Currency’, Reuters, June 10, 2008, www.arabnews.com/?page=6&section=0&article=110727&d=10&m=6&y=2008
11. ‘_TIMELINE-Gulf single currency deadline delayed beyond 2010’, _Forbes, March 23, 2009, www.forbes.com/feeds/afx/2009/03/24/afx6204462.html
12. Agencies, ‘GCC need not rush to form single currency’, Business 24/7, March 26, 2009, www.business24-7.ae/articles/2009/3/pages/25032009/03262009_4e19de908b174f04bfb3c37aec2f17b3.aspx
13. Barry Eichengreen, ‘International Monetary Arrangements: Is There a Monetary Union in Asia’s Future?’, The Brookings Institution, Spring 1997, www.brookings.edu/articles/1997/spring_globaleconomics_eichengreen.aspx
14. ‘After European now Asian Monetary Union?’, Asia Times Online, September 8, 2001, www.atimes.com/editor/CI08Ba01.html
15. ‘ASEAN Makes Moves for Asian Monetary Fund’, Association of Southeast Asian Nations, May 6, 2005, www.aseansec.org/afp/115.htm
16. Reuven Glick, ‘Does Europe’s Path to Monetary Union Provide Lessons for East Asia?’, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, August 12, 2005, www.frbsf.org/publications/economics/letter/2005/el2005-19.html
17. AFP, ‘Asian Monetary Fund may be needed to deal with future shocks’, Channel News Asia, July 2, 2007, www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/afp_world_business/view/285700/1/.html
18. AFX News Limited, ‘East Asia monetary union “feasible” but political will lacking – ADB’, Forbes, September 19, 2007, www.forbes.com/feeds/afx/2007/09/19/afx4133743.html
19. Lin Li, ‘ASEAN discusses financial, monetary integration’, China View, April 2, 2008, http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-04/02/content_7906391.htm
20. Paul De Grauwe, Economics of Monetary Union, Oxford University Press, 2007, pp.109-110
21. Heather Milkiewicz & Paul R. Masson, ‘Africa’s Economic Morass—Will a Common Currency Help?’, The Brookings Institution, July 2003, www.brookings.edu/papers/2003/07africa_masson.aspx
22. John Gahamanyi, ‘Rwanda: African Central Bank Governors Discuss AU Financial Institutions’, The New Times, August 23, 2008, http://allafrica.com/stories/200808230124.html
23. Eric Ombok, ‘African Union, Nigeria Plan Accord on Central Bank’, Bloomberg, March 2, 2009, www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601116&sid=afoY1vOnEMLA&refer=africa
24. Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘Africa in the Quest for a Common Currency’, Republic of Kenya, March 2009, www.mfa.go.ke/mfacms/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=346&Itemid=62
25. Herbert Grubel, ‘The Case for the Amero’, The Fraser Institute, September 1, 1999, p.4, www.fraserinstitute.org/Commerce.Web/publication_details.aspx?pubID=2512
26. Ibid, p.17
27. Thomas Courchene & Richard Harris, ‘From Fixing to Monetary Union: Options for North American Currency Integration’, C.D. Howe Institute, June 1999, p.22, www.cdhowe.org/display.cfm?page=research-fiscal&year=1999
28. Ibid, p.23
29. Barrie McKenna, ‘Dodge Says Single Currency “Possible”‘, The Globe and Mail, May 21, 2007
30. ‘Consider a Continental Currency, Jarislowsky Says’, The Globe and Mail, November 23, 2007, www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071123.RDOLLAR23/TPStory/?query=%22Steven%2BChase%22b
31. CNN, Larry King Live, Transcripts, October 8, 2007, http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0710/08/lkl.01.html
32. Herbert Grubel, ‘Fix the Loonie’, The Financial Post, January 18, 2008, www.nationalpost.com/opinion/story.html?id=245165
33. Todd Harrison, ‘How realistic is a North American currency?’, Market Watch, January 28, 2009, www.marketwatch.com/news/story/Do-we-need-a-North/story.aspx?guid={D10536AF-F929-4AF9-AD10-250B4057A907}
34. ‘Get ready for the phoenix’, The Economist, Vol. 306, January 9, 1988, pp.9-10
35. ECB, ‘The euro and the dollar – new imperatives for policy co-ordination’, Speeches and Interviews, September 18, 2000, www.ecb.int/press/key/date/2000/html/sp000918.en.html
36. IMF, ‘One World, One Currency: Destination or Delusion?’, Economic Forums and International Seminars, November 8, 2000, www.imf.org/external/np/exr/ecforums/110800.htm
37. Robert A. Mundell, ‘World Currency’, The Works of Robert A. Mundell, www.robertmundell.net/Menu/Main.asp?Type=5&Cat=09&ThemeName=World%20Currency
38. Itar-Tass, ‘Russia proposes creation of global super-reserve currency’, ITAR-TASS News Agency, March 16, 2009, www.itar-tass.com/eng/level2.html?NewsID=13682035&PageNum=0
39. Jamil Anderlini, ‘China calls for new reserve currency’, The Financial Times, March 23, 2009, www.ft.com/cms/s/0/7851925a-17a2-11de-8c9d-0000779fd2ac.html
40. CFR, A Conversation with Timothy F. Geithner, Council on Foreign Relations Transcripts, March 25, 2009, www.cfr.org/publication/18925/
41. ‘UN backs new global currency reserve’, The Sunday Telegraph, March 29, 2009, www.news.com.au/business/story/0,27753,25255091-462,00.html
42. Jeffrey E. Garten, ‘Needed: A Fed for the World’, The New York Times, September 23, 1998, www.nytimes.com/1998/09/23/opinion/needed-a-fed-for-the-world.html
43. Jeffrey Garten, ‘We Need a Bank Of the World’, Newsweek, October 25, 2008, www.newsweek.com/id/165772
44. Sean Davidson, ‘Global central bank could prevent future crisis’, Business 24/7, January 10, 2009, www.business24-7.ae/articles/2009/1/pages/01102009_350bc822e4ee4508b724e55b0f1393df.aspx
45. James Politi & Gillian Tett, ‘NY Fed chief in push for global bank framework’, The Financial Times, June 8, 2008, http://us.ft.com/ftgateway/superpage.ft?news_id=fto060820081850443845
46. Rupert Wright, ‘The first barons of banking’, The National, November 6, 2008, www.thenational.ae/article/20081106/BUSINESS/167536298/1005
47. Michael Lafferty, ‘New world order in banking necessary after abject failure of present model’, The Times Online, February 24, 2009, http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/management/article5792585.ece
48. Richard Gwyn, ‘Change not necessarily for the better’, The Toronto Star, April 3, 2009, www.thestar.com/comment/article/612822
49. David Rothkopf, Superclass: The Global Power Elite and the World They are Making, Toronto: Penguin Books, 2008, p.315
50. Ibid, pp.315-316
51. Ibid, p.316
52. Gideon Rachman, ‘And now for a world government’, The Financial Times, December 8, 2008, www.ft.com/cms/s/0/7a03e5b6-c541-11dd-b516-000077b07658.html
53. NIC, Global Trends 2025: A Transformed World, The National Intelligence Council’s 2025 Project, November, 2008, www.dni.gov/nic/NIC_2025_project.html
54. Ibid, p.11
55. Ibid, pp.11-12
56. Ibid, p.94
57. Ibid, p.81
58. Ibid, p.83
59. Ibid, p.87
60. Carroll Quigley, Tragedy and Hope: A History of the World in Our Time, New York: Macmillan Company, 1966, p.324

ANDREW MARSHALL is a Research Associate with the Centre for Research on Globalization based out of Montreal, Canada (www.globalresearch.ca). He has written extensively on issues imperialism in the Middle East and Africa, the environment, Homeland Security, war, terrorism and the global economy. He is currently studying Global Political Economy and the History of the Middle East and Africa at Simon Fraser University (Canada).

The above article appears in
New Dawn No. 115
(July-August 2009)

\#money #alternative #reform #systems #vollgeld #bge #altcoopsys #alternatives #alternativgeld #OsOfSociety #OperatingSystemsOfSociety #SystemPhilosophy #dinero #dollar #euro #yen #rubel #sustainability #resilience #complementary #complementarycurrency #cooperation #monetaryreform #financialreform #financialsystemreform #financialcrisis #mortagecrisis #debtcrisis #suprimecrisis #occupywallsreet #occupyfrankfurt #finance #geldsystem #geldreform #moneysystem #financialsystem #economics #ecologicaleconomics #banking #banken #finanz #finazsystem #financial #system #banks #bank #moneyreform #climatechange #lietaer #banker #worldcurrency #currency #digitalcurrency
Originally posted at: http://altcoopsys.org/2017/01/20/bernard-lietaer-vision-der-zukunft-ehemaliger-zentralbanker-belgiens-wir-werden-gezwungen-sein-unser-geldsystem-bis-2020-zu-reformieren/
Bernard Lietaer Vision der Zukunft ehemaliger ZentralBanker Belgiens – Wir werden gezwungen sein unser Geldsystem bis 2020 zu reformieren

 
Bernard Lietaer Vision der Zukunft ehemaliger ZentralBanker Belgiens - Wir werden gezwungen sein unser Geldsystem bis 2020 zu reformieren

https://youtu.be/wCPSduKJfE4

Bernard Lietaer (ehemaliger ZentralBanker Belgiens) Vision der Zukunft:

Wir werden gezwungen sein unser Geldsystem bis 2020 zu reformieren.

“The Economist” prophezeit eine (vermutlich rein digitale) Weltwährung – leider leider leider könnte uns das so verkauft werden wie den Euro – dass alles besser wird… eine tolle Idee… aber ist diese auch ehrlich gemeint und designed? Oder wiegen die Interessen einiger weniger Egoisten und deren Macht-Sucht wiedermal befriedigt werden muss mehr?

Man muss beim Lietaer Ansatz unterscheiden – er möchte eine Biodiversität an verschiedenen sich ergänzenden Währungen – ein Ökosystem – welches sich auch expandieren und exportieren und skalieren lässt – aber vermutlich keine einzelne alles dominierenden Welt-Währung…





Immagine/fotoImmagine/fotoImmagine/fotoImmagine/foto

Immagine/foto
The Rise of the Phoenix world currency from the ashes of national fiat currencies ie. destruction of fiat currencies via hyperinflation. “Phoenix” is of course an occult metaphor. Out of the destruction, the ashes of the old world order, the Luciferian New World Order will rise like a Phoenix!

download article: ArticleEconomist1988GetReadyforthePhoenix_001.pdf
COVER: “GET READY FOR A WORLD CURRENCY”
Title of article: Get Ready for the Phoenix
Source: Economist; 01/9/88, Vol. 306, pp 9-10
THIRTY years from now, Americans, Japanese, Europeans, and people in many other rich countries, and some relatively poor ones will probably be paying for their shopping with the same currency. Prices will be quoted not in dollars, yen or D-marks but in, let’s say, the phoenix. The phoenix will be favoured by companies and shoppers because it will be more convenient than today’s national currencies, which by then will seem a quaint cause of much disruption to economic life in the last twentieth century.

At the beginning of 1988 this appears an outlandish prediction. Proposals for eventual monetary union proliferated five and ten years ago, but they hardly envisaged the setbacks of 1987. The governments of the big economies tried to move an inch or two towards a more managed system of exchange rates – a logical preliminary, it might seem, to radical monetary reform. For lack of co-operation in their underlying economic policies they bungled it horribly, and provoked the rise in interest rates that brought on the stock market crash of October. These events have chastened exchange-rate reformers. The market crash taught them that the pretence of policy co-operation can be worse than nothing, and that until real co-operation is feasible (i.e., until governments surrender some economic sovereignty) further attempts to peg currencies will flounder.

The new world economy
The biggest change in the world economy since the early 1970’s is that flows of money have replaced trade in goods as the force that drives exchange rates. as a result of the relentless integration of the world’s financial markets, differences in national economic policies can disturb interest rates (or expectations of future interest rates) only slightly, yet still call forth huge transfers of financial assets from one country to another. These transfers swamp the flow of trade revenues in their effect on the demand and supply for different currencies, and hence in their effect on exchange rates. As telecommunications technology continues to advance, these transactions will be cheaper and faster still. With unco-ordinated economic policies, currencies can get only more volatile.
….
In all these ways national economic boundaries are slowly dissolving. As the trend continues, the appeal of a currency union across at least the main industrial countries will seem irresistible to everybody except foreign-exchange traders and governments. In the phoenix zone, economic adjustment to shifts in relative prices would happen smoothly and automatically, rather as it does today between different regions within large economies (a brief on pages 74-75 explains how.) The absence of all currency risk would spur trade, investment and employment (not).

The phoenix zone would impose tight constraints on national governments. There would be no such thing, for instance, as a national monetary policy. The world phoenix supply would be fixed by a new central bank, descended perhaps from the IMF. The world inflation rate – and hence, within narrow margins, each national inflation rate- would be in its charge. Each country could use taxes and public spending to offset temporary falls in demand, but it would have to borrow rather than print money to finance its budget deficit. With no recourse to the inflation tax, governments and their creditors would be forced to judge their borrowing and lending plans more carefully than they do today. This means a big loss of economic sovereignty, but the trends that make the phoenix so appealing are taking that sovereignty away in any case. Even in a world of more-or-less floating exchange rates, individual governments have seen their policy independence checked by an unfriendly outside world.

As the next century approaches, the natural forces that are pushing the world towards economic integration will offer governments a broad choice. They can go with the flow, or they can build barricades. Preparing the way for the phoenix will mean fewer pretended agreements on policy and more real ones. It will mean allowing and then actively promoting the private-sector use of an international money alongside existing national monies. That would let people vote with their wallets for the eventual move to full currency union. The phoenix would probably start as a cocktail of national currencies, just as the Special Drawing Right is today. In time, though, its value against national currencies would cease to matter, because people would choose it for its convenience and the stability of its purchasing power.
…..
The alternative – to preserve policymaking autonomy- would involve a new proliferation of truly draconian controls on trade and capital flows. This course offers governments a splendid time. They could manage exchange-rate movements, deploy monetary and fiscal policy without inhibition, and tackle the resulting bursts of inflation with prices and incomes polices. It is a growth-crippling prospect. Pencil in the phoenix for around 2018, and welcome it when it comes. (not)

http://www.economist.com/

https://endtimeobserver.blogspot.de/2009/09/flashback-1988-economist-magazine-get.html

On this blog we’ve made frequent mention of late for the drive toward a new world economic order, including the push for a singular world currency.

However, it’s worth noting that it’s not just Christian prophecy-watchers and so-called “conspiracy nuts” who have long been watching for the emergence of a world currency. Twenty-one years ago, The Economist magazine spoke of the coming world currency, which they named “the phoenix”.

To the skeptics, all this talk of a coming new world order, one world government, and the Antichrist all sounds like silly talk. I’m sure when Noah warned the world of the flood to come, that sounded like silly talk too.

… until the rain started to fall.

————————–

COVER: “GET READY FOR A WORLD CURRENCY”
Title of article: Get Ready for the Phoenix
Source: Economist; 01/9/88, Vol. 306, pp 9-10

From the article:

“THIRTY years from now, Americans, Japanese, Europeans, and people in many other rich countries, and some relatively poor ones will probably be paying for their shopping with the same currency. Prices will be quoted not in dollars, yen or D-marks but in, let’s say, the phoenix. The phoenix will be favoured by companies and shoppers because it will be more convenient than today’s national currencies, which by then will seem a quaint cause of much disruption to economic life in the last twentieth century.

At the beginning of 1988 this appears an outlandish prediction. Proposals for eventual monetary union proliferated five and ten years ago, but they hardly envisaged the setbacks of 1987.”

(Note: the writer is apparently referring here to the events related to October 19, 1987 — often referred to as “Black Monday”– when stock markets crashed in the U.S. and around the world, shedding a huge value in a very short time.)

another quote…

” As the next century approaches, the natural forces that are pushing the world towards economic integration will offer governments a broad choice. They can go with the flow, or they can build barricades. Preparing the way for the phoenix will mean fewer pretended agreements on policy and more real ones. It will mean allowing and then actively promoting the private-sector use of an international money alongside existing national monies. That would let people vote with their wallets for the eventual move to full currency union. The phoenix would probably start as a cocktail of national currencies, just as the Special Drawing Right is today. In time, though, its value against national currencies would cease to matter, because people would choose it for its convenience and the stability of its purchasing power.”

Full article here.

Links Related;



http://www.singleglobalcurrency.org/documents/ArticleEconomist1988GetReadyforthePhoenix_001.doc

Related Content:



Coming Soon:
A Global Central Bank, Global Currency & World Government

© By ANDREW MARSHALL

Following the 2009 G20 summit, plans were announced for implementing the creation of a new global currency to replace the US dollar’s role as the world reserve currency. Point 19 of the communiqué released by the G20 at the end of the Summit stated, “We have agreed to support a general SDR allocation which will inject $250 billion into the world economy and increase global liquidity.” SDRs, or Special Drawing Rights, are “a synthetic paper currency issued by the International Monetary Fund.”

As the Telegraph reported, “the G20 leaders have activated the IMF’s power to create money and begin global ‘quantitative easing’. In doing so, they are putting a de facto world currency into play. It is outside the control of any sovereign body. Conspiracy theorists will love it.”1
The article continued in stating that, “there is now a world currency in waiting. In time, SDRs are likely to evolve into a parking place for the foreign holdings of central banks, led by the People’s Bank of China.” Further, “the creation of a Financial Stability Board looks like the first step towards a global financial regulator,” or, in other words, a global central bank.
It is important to take a closer look at these “solutions” being proposed and implemented in the midst of the current global financial crisis. These are not new suggestions, as they have been in the plans of the global elite for a long time. However, in the midst of the current crisis, the elite have fast-tracked their agenda of forging a New World Order in finance. It is important to address the background to these proposed and imposed “solutions” and what effects they will have on the International Monetary System (IMS) and the global political economy as a whole.

A New Bretton-Woods

In October of 2008, Gordon Brown, Prime Minister of the UK, said that we “must have a new Bretton Woods – building a new international financial architecture for the years ahead.” He continued in saying that, “we must now reform the international financial system,” and that he would want “to see the IMF reformed to become a ‘global central bank’ closely monitoring the international economy and financial system.”2
On October 17, 2008, Gordon Brown wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post in which he said that this ‘new Bretton-Woods’ should work towards “global governance,” and implementing “shared global standards for accounting and regulation,” and “the renewal of our international institutions to make them effective early-warning systems for the world economy.”3
In early October 2008, it was reported that, “as the world’s central bankers gather this week in Washington DC for an IMF-World Bank conference to discuss the crisis, the big question they face is whether it is time to establish a global economic ‘policeman’ to ensure the crash of 2008 can never be repeated.” Further, “any organisation with the power to police the global economy would have to include representatives of every major country – a United Nations of economic regulation.” A former governor of the Bank of England suggested that, “the answer might already be staring us in the face, in the form of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS),” however, “the problem is that it has no teeth. The IMF tends to couch its warnings about economic problems in very diplomatic language, but the BIS is more independent and much better placed to deal with this if it is given the power to do so.”4

Emergence of Regional Currencies

On January 1, 1999, the European Union established the Euro as its regional currency. The Euro has grown in prominence over the past several years. However, it is not to be the only regional currency in the world. There are moves and calls for other regional currencies throughout the world.
In 2007, Foreign Affairs, the journal of the Council on Foreign Relations, ran an article titled, ‘The End of National Currency’, in which it began by discussing the volatility of international currency markets, and that very few “real” solutions have been proposed to address successive currency crises.
The author poses the question, “Will restoring lost sovereignty to governments put an end to financial instability?” He answers by stating that, “this is a dangerous misdiagnosis,” and that, “the right course is not to return to a mythical past of monetary sovereignty, with governments controlling local interest and exchange rates in blissful ignorance of the rest of the world. Governments must let go of the fatal notion that nationhood requires them to make and control the money used in their territory. National currencies and global markets simply do not mix; together they make a deadly brew of currency crises and geopolitical tension and create ready pretexts for damaging protectionism. In order to globalise safely, countries should abandon monetary nationalism and abolish unwanted currencies, the source of much of today’s instability.”
The author explains that, “monetary nationalism is simply incompatible with globalisation. It has always been, even if this has only become apparent since the 1970s, when all the world’s governments rendered their currencies intrinsically worthless.” The author states that, “since economic development outside the process of globalisation is no longer possible, countries should abandon monetary nationalism. Governments should replace national currencies with the dollar or the euro or, in the case of Asia, collaborate to produce a new multinational currency over a comparably large and economically diversified area.” Essentially, according to the author, the solution lies in regional currencies.5
In October of 2008, “European Central Bank council member Ewald Nowotny said a ‘tri-polar’ global currency system is developing between Asia, Europe and the US and that he’s skeptical the US dollar’s centrality can be revived.”6
In South America, there are moves to create a regional currency and central bank under the Union of South American Nations, which was established in May of 2008.7,8 The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), a regional trade bloc of Arabic Gulf nations, has also been making moves towards creating a regional central bank and common currency for its member nations, following the example of Europe, and even being advised by the European Central Bank.9-12
From the time of the East Asian financial crisis in the late 1990s, there have been calls for the creation of a regional currency for East Asia among the ten member nations of the ASEAN bloc, as well as China, Japan and South Korea. In 2008, ASEAN central bank officials and financial ministers met to discuss monetary integration in the region.13-19
Within Africa, there are already certain regional monetary unions, and within the framework of the African Union, there are moves being implemented to create an African currency under the control of an African Central Bank (ACB), which is to be located in Nigeria.20-24
In North America, there are moves, coinciding with the deepening economic and political integration of the continent under NAFTA and the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America (SPP), to create a regional currency for North America, aptly given the current designation as the Amero, and even the then-Governor of the Central Bank of Canada, David Dodge, in 2007, said that a regional currency was “possible.”25-33

A Global Currency

In 1988, The Economist ran an article titled, ‘Get Ready for the Phoenix’, in which they wrote, “thirty years from now, Americans, Japanese, Europeans, and people in many other rich countries and some relatively poor ones will probably be paying for their shopping with the same currency. Prices will be quoted not in dollars, yen or D-marks but in, let’s say, the phoenix. The phoenix will be favoured by companies and shoppers because it will be more convenient than today’s national currencies, which by then will seem a quaint cause of much disruption to economic life in the late twentieth century.”
The article stated that, “The market crash [of 1987] taught [governments]that the pretence of policy cooperation can be worse than nothing, and that until real co-operation is feasible (ie, until governments surrender some economic sovereignty) further attempts to peg currencies will flounder.”
Amazingly the author of the article adds that, “Several more big exchange-rate upsets, a few more stockmarket crashes and probably a slump or two will be needed before politicians are willing to face squarely up to that choice. This points to a muddled sequence of emergency followed by patch-up followed by emergency, stretching out far beyond 2018 – except for two things. As time passes, the damage caused by currency instability is gradually going to mount; and the very trends that will make it mount are making the utopia of monetary union feasible.”
The article advocated the formation of a global central bank, perhaps through the IMF, and “this means a big loss of economic sovereignty, but the trends that make the phoenix so appealing are taking that sovereignty away in any case.”
The article concludes in stating that, “The phoenix would probably start as a cocktail of national currencies, just as the Special Drawing Right is today. In time, though, its value against national currencies would cease to matter, because people would choose it for its convenience and the stability of its purchasing power.” The last sentence says, “Pencil in the phoenix for around 2018, and welcome it when it comes.”34
Former US Federal Reserve Governor Paul Volcker has said that, “if we are to have a truly global economy, a single world currency makes sense.” A European Central Bank executive stated that, “we might one day have a single world currency,” in “a step towards the ideal situation of a fully integrated world.”35
The IMF held a conference in 2000 discussing how the world was segmenting into regional currency blocs and that a single world currency was possible, and that it is, in fact, preferable.36 Nobel Prize winning economist Robert Mundell has long advocated the creation of a global currency, and that it “would restore a needed coherence to the international monetary system, give the International Monetary Fund a function that would help it to promote stability, and be a catalyst for international harmony.”37
In March 2009, Russia suggested that the G20 meeting in April should “consider the possibility of creating a supra-national reserve currency or a ‘super-reserve currency’,” and to consider the IMF’s Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) in this capacity.38 A week later, China’s central bank governor proposed the creation of a global currency controlled by the IMF, replacing the US dollar as the world reserve currency, also using the IMF’s SDRs as the reserve currency basket against which all other currencies would be fixed.39
Days after this proposal, the US Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, former President of the New York Federal Reserve Bank, told the Council on Foreign Relations that, in response to a question about the Chinese proposal, “we’re actually quite open to that suggestion. But you should think of it as rather evolutionary, building on the current architectures, than – rather than – rather than moving us to global monetary union.”40
In late March a UN panel of economists recommended the creation of a new global currency reserve that would replace the US dollar, and that it would be an “independently administered reserve currency.”41

Creating a World Central Bank

In 1998, Jeffrey Garten wrote an article for the New York Times advocating a “global Fed.” Garten was former Dean of the Yale School of Management, former Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade in the Clinton administration, previously served on the White House Council on International Economic Policy under the Nixon administration and on the policy planning staffs of Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and Cyrus Vance of the Ford and Carter administrations, former Managing Director at Lehman Brothers, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
In his article written in 1998, he stated that, “over time the United States set up crucial central institutions – the Securities and Exchange Commission (1933), the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (1934) and, most important, the Federal Reserve (1913). In so doing, America became a managed national economy. These organisations were created to make capitalism work, to prevent destructive business cycles and to moderate the harsh, invisible hand of Adam Smith.” He stated that, “this is what now must occur on a global scale. The world needs an institution that has a hand on the economic rudder when the seas become stormy. It needs a global central bank.”
Interestingly, Garten states that, “one thing that would not be acceptable would be for the bank to be at the mercy of short-term-oriented legislatures.” In essence, it is not to be accountable to the people of the world. So, he asks the question, “To whom would a global central bank be accountable? It would have too much power to be governed only by technocrats, although it must be led by the best of them. One possibility would be to link the new bank to an enlarged Group of Seven – perhaps a ‘G-15’ [or in today’s context, the G20] that would include the G-7 plus rotating members like Mexico, Brazil, South Africa, Poland, India, China and South Korea.” He further states that, “There would have to be very close collaboration” between the global bank and the Fed.42
In September of 2008, Jeffrey Garten wrote an article for the Financial Times in which he stated that, “Even if the US’s massive financial rescue operation succeeds, it should be followed by something even more far-reaching – the establishment of a Global Monetary Authority to oversee markets that have become borderless.”
In late October of 2008, Garten wrote an article for Newsweek in which he stated that, “leaders should begin laying the groundwork for establishing a global central bank.” He explained that, “there was a time when the US Federal Reserve played this role [as governing financial authority of the world], as the prime financial institution of the world’s most powerful economy, overseeing the one global currency. But with the growth of capital markets, the rise of currencies like the euro and the emergence of powerful players such as China, the shift of wealth to Asia and the Persian Gulf and, of course, the deep-seated problems in the American economy itself, the Fed no longer has the capability to lead single-handedly.”43
In January of 2009, it was reported that, “one clear solution to avoid a repeat of the problems would be the establishment of a ‘global central bank’ – with the IMF and World Bank being unable to prevent the financial meltdown.” Dr. William Overholt, senior research fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School, formerly with the Rand Institute, gave a speech in Dubai in which he said that, “To avoid another crisis, we need an ability to manage global liquidity. Theoretically that could be achieved through some kind of global central bank, or through the creation of a global currency, or through global acceptance of a set of rules with sanctions and a dispute settlement mechanism.”44

A “New World Order” in Banking

In June of 2008, before he was Treasury Secretary in the Obama administration, Timothy Geithner, as head of the New York Federal Reserve, wrote an article for the Financial Times following his attendance at the 2008 Bilderberg conference, in which he said that, “banks and investment banks whose health is crucial to the global financial system should operate under a unified regulatory framework,” and that, “the US Federal Reserve should play a ‘central role’ in the new regulatory framework, working closely with supervisors in the US and around the world.”45
In November of 2008, The National, a prominent United Arab Emirates newspaper, reported on Baron David de Rothschild accompanying UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown on a visit to the Middle East, although not as a “part of the official party” accompanying Brown. Following an interview with the Baron, it was reported that, “Rothschild shares most people’s view that there is a new world order. In his opinion, banks will deleverage and there will be a new form of global governance.”46
In February of 2009, the Times Online reported that a “new world order in banking [is]necessary,” and that, “it is increasingly evident that the world needs a new banking system and that it should not bear much resemblance to the one that has failed so spectacularly.”47
But of course, the elites that are shaping this new banking system are the champions of the previous banking system. The solutions that will follow are simply the extensions of the current system, only sped up through the necessity posed by the current crisis.

An Emerging Global Government

An April 3, 2009 article in the Toronto Star, reported that the G20 “confab constitutes the first great get-together of the new world order. This geopolitical order may follow a number of directions, by no means all of them pleasant. But its defining characteristic is already unchangeable.” Further, “An uncomfortable characteristic of the new world order may well turn out to be that global income gaps will widen because the rising powers, such as China, India and Brazil, regard those below them on the ladder as potential rivals.” The author further states that, “The new world order thus won’t necessarily be any better than the old one,” and that, “what is certain, though, is that global affairs are going to be considerably different from now on.”48
David Rothkopf, a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, former Deputy Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade in the Clinton administration, and former managing director of Kissinger and Associates, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, recently wrote a book titled, Superclass: The Global Power Elite and the World They are Making, of which he is certainly a member. When discussing the role and agenda of the global “superclass,” he states that, “in a world of global movements and threats that don’t present their passports at national borders, it is no longer possible for a nation-state acting alone to fulfil its portion of the social contract.”49
He writes that “the international organisations and alliances we have today,” are evolving and achieving great things, despite certain flaws, and that he is “optimistic that progress will continue to be made,” but it will be difficult, because it “undercuts many national and local power structures and cultural concepts that have foundations deep in the bedrock of human civilisation, namely the notion of sovereignty.”50 He further notes that, “mechanisms of global governance are more achievable in today’s environment,” and that these mechanisms “are often creative with temporary solutions to urgent problems that cannot wait for the world to embrace a bigger and more controversial idea like real global government.”51
In December of 2008, the Financial Times ran an article written by Gideon Rachman, a past Bilderberg attendee, who wrote that, “for the first time in my life, I think the formation of some sort of world government is plausible,” and that, “a ‘world government’ would involve much more than co-operation between nations. It would be an entity with state-like characteristics, backed by a body of laws. The European Union has already set up a continental government for 27 countries, which could be a model. The EU has a supreme court, a currency, thousands of pages of law, a large civil service and the ability to deploy military force.” Asking if the European model could “go global,” he states that it can, and that this is made possible through an awakening “change in the political atmosphere,” as “the financial crisis and climate change are pushing national governments towards global solutions, even in countries such as China and the US that are traditionally fierce guardians of national sovereignty.”
He quoted an adviser to French President Nicolas Sarkozy as saying, “global governance is just a euphemism for global government,” and that the “core of the international financial crisis is that we have global financial markets and no global rule of law.” However, Rachman states that any push towards a global government “will be a painful, slow process.” He then states that a key problem in this push can be explained with an example from the EU, which “has suffered a series of humiliating defeats in referendums, when plans for ‘ever closer union’ have been referred to the voters. In general, the Union has progressed fastest when far-reaching deals have been agreed by technocrats and politicians – and then pushed through without direct reference to the voters. International governance tends to be effective, only when it is anti-democratic. [Emphasis added]”52
In November of 2008, the United States National Intelligence Council (NIC), the US intelligence community’s “centre for midterm and long-term strategic thinking,” released a report that it produced in collaboration with numerous think tanks, consulting firms, academic institutions and hundreds of other experts, among them are the Atlantic Council of the United States, the Wilson Center, RAND Corporation, the Brookings Institution, American Enterprise Institute, Texas A&M University, the Council on Foreign Relations and Chatham House in London.53
The report, titled Global Trends 2025: A Transformed World, outlines the current global political and economic trends that the world may be going through by the year 2025. In terms of the financial crisis, it states that solving this “will require long-term efforts to establish a new international system.”54 It suggests that as the “China-model” for development becomes increasingly attractive, there may be a “decline in democratisation” for emerging economies, authoritarian regimes, and “weak democracies frustrated by years of economic underperformance.” Further, the dollar will cease to be the global reserve currency, as there would likely be a “move away from the dollar.”55
It states that the dollar will become “something of a first among equals in a basket of currencies by 2025. This could occur suddenly in the wake of a crisis, or gradually with global rebalancing.”56 The report elaborates on the construction of a new international system, stating that, “by 2025, nation-states will no longer be the only – and often not the most important – actors on the world stage and the ‘international system’ will have morphed to accommodate the new reality. But the transformation will be incomplete and uneven.” It also notes that, “most of the pressing transnational problems – including climate change, regulation of globalised financial markets, migration, failing states, crime networks, etc. – are unlikely to be effectively resolved by the actions of individual nation-states. The need for effective global governance will increase faster than existing mechanisms can respond.”57
The report discusses the topic of regionalism, stating that, “Asian regionalism would have global implications, possibly sparking or reinforcing a trend toward three trade and financial clusters that could become quasi-blocs (North America, Europe, and East Asia).” These blocs “would have implications for the ability to achieve future global World Trade Organisation agreements and regional clusters could compete in the setting of trans-regional product standards for IT, biotech, nanotech, intellectual property rights, and other ‘new economy’ products.”58
Reflecting similar assumptions made by Rachman in his article advocating a world government is the topic of democratisation, on which the report says, “advances are likely to slow and globalisation will subject many recently democratised countries to increasing social and economic pressures that could undermine liberal institutions.” This is largely because “the better economic performance of many authoritarian governments could sow doubts among some about democracy as the best form of government. The surveys we consulted indicated that many East Asians put greater emphasis on good management, including increasing standards of livings, than democracy.” Further, “even in many well-established democracies, surveys show growing frustration with the current workings of democratic government and questioning among elites over the ability of democratic governments to take the bold actions necessary to deal rapidly and effectively with the growing number of transnational challenges.”59

The Creation of a New World Order

Ultimately, what this implies is that the future of the global political economy is one of increasing moves toward a global system of governance, or a world government, with a world central bank and global currency; and that, concurrently, these developments are likely to materialise in the face of and as a result of a decline in democracy around the world, and thus, a rise in authoritarianism. What we are witnessing is the creation of a New World Order, controlled by a totalitarian global government structure.
In fact, the very concept of a global currency and global central bank is authoritarian in its very nature, as it removes any vestiges of oversight and accountability away from the people of the world, and toward a small, increasingly interconnected group of international elites.
As Carroll Quigley explained in his monumental book, Tragedy and Hope, “[T]he powers of financial capitalism had another far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent private meetings and conferences. The apex of the system was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basle, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world’s central banks which were themselves private corporations.”60
Indeed, the current “solutions” being proposed to the global financial crisis benefit those that caused the crisis over those that are poised to suffer the most as a result of the crisis: the disappearing middle classes, the world’s dispossessed, poor, indebted people. The proposed solutions to this crisis represent the manifestations and actualisation of the ultimate generational goals of the global elite; and thus, represent the least favourable conditions for the vast majority of the world’s people.
It is imperative that the world’s people throw their weight against these “solutions” and usher in a new era of world order, one of the People’s World Order; with the solution lying in local governance and local economies, so that the people have greater roles in determining the future and structure of their own political-economy, and thus, their own society. With this alternative of localised political economies, in conjunction with an unprecedented global population and international democratisation of communication through the internet, we have the means and possibility before us to forge the most diverse manifestation of cultures and societies that humanity has ever known.
The answer lies in the individual’s internalisation of human power and destination, and a rejection of the externalisation of power and human destiny to a global authority of which all but a select few people have access to. To internalise human power and destiny is to realise the gift of a human mind, which has the ability to engage in thought beyond the material, such as food and shelter, and venture into the realm of the conceptual. Each individual possesses – within themselves – the ability to think critically about themselves and their own life; now is the time to utilise this ability with the aim of internalising the concepts and questions of human power and destiny: Why are we here? Where are we going? Where should we be going? How do we get there?
The supposed answers to these questions are offered to us by a tiny global elite who fear the repercussions of what would take place if the people of the world were to begin to answer these questions themselves. I do not know the answers to these questions, but I do know that the answers lie in the human mind and spirit, that which has overcome and will continue to overcome the greatest of challenges to humanity, and will, without doubt, triumph over the New World Order.

Footnotes:

1. Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, ‘The G20 moves the world a step closer to a global currency’, The Telegraph, April 3, 2009, www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment/ambroseevans_pritchard/5096524/The-G20-moves-the-world-a-step-closer-to-a-global-currency.html
2. Robert Winnett, ‘Financial Crisis: Gordon Brown calls for “new Bretton Woods”,’ The Telegraph, October 13, 2008, www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financetopics/financialcrisis/3189517/Financial-Crisis-Gordon-Brown-calls-for-new-Bretton-Woods.html
3. Gordon Brown, ‘Out of the Ashes’, The Washington Post, October 17, 2008, www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/10/16/AR2008101603179.html
4. Gordon Rayner, ‘Global financial crisis: does the world need a new banking “policeman”?’, The Telegraph, October 8, 2008, www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financetopics/financialcrisis/3155563/Global-financial-crisis-does-the-world-need-a-new-banking-policeman.html
5. Benn Steil, ‘The End of National Currency’, Foreign Affairs, Vol. 86, Issue 3, May/June 2007, pp.83-96
6. Jonathan Tirone, ‘ECB’s Nowotny Sees Global “Tri-Polar” Currency System Evolving’, Bloomberg, October 19, 2008, www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=apjqJKKQvfDc&refer=home
7. BBC, ‘South America nations found union’, BBC News, May 23, 2008, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7417896.stm
8. CNews, ‘South American nations to seek common currency’, China View, May 26, 2008, http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-05/27/content_8260847.htm
9. AME Info, ‘GCC: Full steam ahead to monetary union’, September 19, 2005, www.ameinfo.com/67925.html
10. John Irish, ‘GCC Agrees on Monetary Union but Signals Delay in Common Currency’, Reuters, June 10, 2008, www.arabnews.com/?page=6&section=0&article=110727&d=10&m=6&y=2008
11. ‘_TIMELINE-Gulf single currency deadline delayed beyond 2010’, _Forbes, March 23, 2009, www.forbes.com/feeds/afx/2009/03/24/afx6204462.html
12. Agencies, ‘GCC need not rush to form single currency’, Business 24/7, March 26, 2009, www.business24-7.ae/articles/2009/3/pages/25032009/03262009_4e19de908b174f04bfb3c37aec2f17b3.aspx
13. Barry Eichengreen, ‘International Monetary Arrangements: Is There a Monetary Union in Asia’s Future?’, The Brookings Institution, Spring 1997, www.brookings.edu/articles/1997/spring_globaleconomics_eichengreen.aspx
14. ‘After European now Asian Monetary Union?’, Asia Times Online, September 8, 2001, www.atimes.com/editor/CI08Ba01.html
15. ‘ASEAN Makes Moves for Asian Monetary Fund’, Association of Southeast Asian Nations, May 6, 2005, www.aseansec.org/afp/115.htm
16. Reuven Glick, ‘Does Europe’s Path to Monetary Union Provide Lessons for East Asia?’, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, August 12, 2005, www.frbsf.org/publications/economics/letter/2005/el2005-19.html
17. AFP, ‘Asian Monetary Fund may be needed to deal with future shocks’, Channel News Asia, July 2, 2007, www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/afp_world_business/view/285700/1/.html
18. AFX News Limited, ‘East Asia monetary union “feasible” but political will lacking – ADB’, Forbes, September 19, 2007, www.forbes.com/feeds/afx/2007/09/19/afx4133743.html
19. Lin Li, ‘ASEAN discusses financial, monetary integration’, China View, April 2, 2008, http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-04/02/content_7906391.htm
20. Paul De Grauwe, Economics of Monetary Union, Oxford University Press, 2007, pp.109-110
21. Heather Milkiewicz & Paul R. Masson, ‘Africa’s Economic Morass—Will a Common Currency Help?’, The Brookings Institution, July 2003, www.brookings.edu/papers/2003/07africa_masson.aspx
22. John Gahamanyi, ‘Rwanda: African Central Bank Governors Discuss AU Financial Institutions’, The New Times, August 23, 2008, http://allafrica.com/stories/200808230124.html
23. Eric Ombok, ‘African Union, Nigeria Plan Accord on Central Bank’, Bloomberg, March 2, 2009, www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601116&sid=afoY1vOnEMLA&refer=africa
24. Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘Africa in the Quest for a Common Currency’, Republic of Kenya, March 2009, www.mfa.go.ke/mfacms/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=346&Itemid=62
25. Herbert Grubel, ‘The Case for the Amero’, The Fraser Institute, September 1, 1999, p.4, www.fraserinstitute.org/Commerce.Web/publication_details.aspx?pubID=2512
26. Ibid, p.17
27. Thomas Courchene & Richard Harris, ‘From Fixing to Monetary Union: Options for North American Currency Integration’, C.D. Howe Institute, June 1999, p.22, www.cdhowe.org/display.cfm?page=research-fiscal&year=1999
28. Ibid, p.23
29. Barrie McKenna, ‘Dodge Says Single Currency “Possible”‘, The Globe and Mail, May 21, 2007
30. ‘Consider a Continental Currency, Jarislowsky Says’, The Globe and Mail, November 23, 2007, www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071123.RDOLLAR23/TPStory/?query=%22Steven%2BChase%22b
31. CNN, Larry King Live, Transcripts, October 8, 2007, http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0710/08/lkl.01.html
32. Herbert Grubel, ‘Fix the Loonie’, The Financial Post, January 18, 2008, www.nationalpost.com/opinion/story.html?id=245165
33. Todd Harrison, ‘How realistic is a North American currency?’, Market Watch, January 28, 2009, www.marketwatch.com/news/story/Do-we-need-a-North/story.aspx?guid={D10536AF-F929-4AF9-AD10-250B4057A907}
34. ‘Get ready for the phoenix’, The Economist, Vol. 306, January 9, 1988, pp.9-10
35. ECB, ‘The euro and the dollar – new imperatives for policy co-ordination’, Speeches and Interviews, September 18, 2000, www.ecb.int/press/key/date/2000/html/sp000918.en.html
36. IMF, ‘One World, One Currency: Destination or Delusion?’, Economic Forums and International Seminars, November 8, 2000, www.imf.org/external/np/exr/ecforums/110800.htm
37. Robert A. Mundell, ‘World Currency’, The Works of Robert A. Mundell, www.robertmundell.net/Menu/Main.asp?Type=5&Cat=09&ThemeName=World%20Currency
38. Itar-Tass, ‘Russia proposes creation of global super-reserve currency’, ITAR-TASS News Agency, March 16, 2009, www.itar-tass.com/eng/level2.html?NewsID=13682035&PageNum=0
39. Jamil Anderlini, ‘China calls for new reserve currency’, The Financial Times, March 23, 2009, www.ft.com/cms/s/0/7851925a-17a2-11de-8c9d-0000779fd2ac.html
40. CFR, A Conversation with Timothy F. Geithner, Council on Foreign Relations Transcripts, March 25, 2009, www.cfr.org/publication/18925/
41. ‘UN backs new global currency reserve’, The Sunday Telegraph, March 29, 2009, www.news.com.au/business/story/0,27753,25255091-462,00.html
42. Jeffrey E. Garten, ‘Needed: A Fed for the World’, The New York Times, September 23, 1998, www.nytimes.com/1998/09/23/opinion/needed-a-fed-for-the-world.html
43. Jeffrey Garten, ‘We Need a Bank Of the World’, Newsweek, October 25, 2008, www.newsweek.com/id/165772
44. Sean Davidson, ‘Global central bank could prevent future crisis’, Business 24/7, January 10, 2009, www.business24-7.ae/articles/2009/1/pages/01102009_350bc822e4ee4508b724e55b0f1393df.aspx
45. James Politi & Gillian Tett, ‘NY Fed chief in push for global bank framework’, The Financial Times, June 8, 2008, http://us.ft.com/ftgateway/superpage.ft?news_id=fto060820081850443845
46. Rupert Wright, ‘The first barons of banking’, The National, November 6, 2008, www.thenational.ae/article/20081106/BUSINESS/167536298/1005
47. Michael Lafferty, ‘New world order in banking necessary after abject failure of present model’, The Times Online, February 24, 2009, http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/management/article5792585.ece
48. Richard Gwyn, ‘Change not necessarily for the better’, The Toronto Star, April 3, 2009, www.thestar.com/comment/article/612822
49. David Rothkopf, Superclass: The Global Power Elite and the World They are Making, Toronto: Penguin Books, 2008, p.315
50. Ibid, pp.315-316
51. Ibid, p.316
52. Gideon Rachman, ‘And now for a world government’, The Financial Times, December 8, 2008, www.ft.com/cms/s/0/7a03e5b6-c541-11dd-b516-000077b07658.html
53. NIC, Global Trends 2025: A Transformed World, The National Intelligence Council’s 2025 Project, November, 2008, www.dni.gov/nic/NIC_2025_project.html
54. Ibid, p.11
55. Ibid, pp.11-12
56. Ibid, p.94
57. Ibid, p.81
58. Ibid, p.83
59. Ibid, p.87
60. Carroll Quigley, Tragedy and Hope: A History of the World in Our Time, New York: Macmillan Company, 1966, p.324

ANDREW MARSHALL is a Research Associate with the Centre for Research on Globalization based out of Montreal, Canada (www.globalresearch.ca). He has written extensively on issues imperialism in the Middle East and Africa, the environment, Homeland Security, war, terrorism and the global economy. He is currently studying Global Political Economy and the History of the Middle East and Africa at Simon Fraser University (Canada).

The above article appears in
New Dawn No. 115
(July-August 2009)

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Originally posted at: http://altcoopsys.org/2017/01/20/bernard-lietaer-vision-der-zukunft-ehemaliger-zentralbanker-belgiens-wir-werden-gezwungen-sein-unser-geldsystem-bis-2020-zu-reformieren/
Bernard Lietaer Vision der Zukunft ehemaliger ZentralBanker Belgiens – Wir werden gezwungen sein unser Geldsystem bis 2020 zu reformieren

 
YesMagazine




http://www.yesmagazine.org/new-economy

\#money #alternative #reform #systems #vollgeld #bge #altcoopsys #alternatives #alternativgeld #OsOfSociety #OperatingSystemsOfSociety #SystemPhilosophy #dinero #dollar #euro #yen #rubel #sustainability #resilience #complementary #complementarycurrency #cooperation #monetaryreform #financialreform #financialsystemreform #financialcrisis #mortagecrisis #debtcrisis #suprimecrisis #occupywallsreet #occupyfrankfurt #finance #geldsystem #geldreform #moneysystem #financialsystem #economics #ecologicaleconomics #lifeeconomy #bank #banking #positive
Originally posted at: http://altcoopsys.org/2017/01/24/yesmagazine/
YesMagazine

 
YesMagazine




http://www.yesmagazine.org/new-economy

\#money #alternative #reform #systems #vollgeld #bge #altcoopsys #alternatives #alternativgeld #OsOfSociety #OperatingSystemsOfSociety #SystemPhilosophy #dinero #dollar #euro #yen #rubel #sustainability #resilience #complementary #complementarycurrency #cooperation #monetaryreform #financialreform #financialsystemreform #financialcrisis #mortagecrisis #debtcrisis #suprimecrisis #occupywallsreet #occupyfrankfurt #finance #geldsystem #geldreform #moneysystem #financialsystem #economics #ecologicaleconomics #lifeeconomy #bank #banking #positive
Originally posted at: http://altcoopsys.org/2017/01/24/yesmagazine/
YesMagazine

 

Pain, agriculture, café, démocratie... À Mâlain, on invente l’alternative totale



#agriculture #alternatives #Côte-d-Or #associatif #université-populaire

 

Une ferme collective : c'est pour bientôt !



#agriculture #collectif #Gers #alternatives

 
#decentralized #federated #social #facebook #alternatives #Diaspora

 
#decentralized #federated #social #facebook #alternatives #Diaspora

 

Science Search Engines



A question was posted today about alternatives to Google Scholar and thought a list of responses is worth sharing. Please add more in the comments if you know of other alternatives.

Two metasearch engines offer a science interface:A list of academic databases and search engines from Wikipedia:
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_academic_databases_and_search_engines
#Science #Search #SearchEngines #Metasearch #SearX #MetaGer #GoogleScholar #ScholarGoogle #Google #Alternatives #OpenScience #OpenAccess

searx.me

searx - a privacy-respecting, hackable metasearch engine

 

Science Search Engines



A question was posted today about alternatives to Google Scholar and thought a list of responses is worth sharing. Please add more in the comments if you know of other alternatives.

Two metasearch engines offer a science interface:A list of academic databases and search engines from Wikipedia:
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_academic_databases_and_search_engines
#Science #Search #SearchEngines #Metasearch #SearX #MetaGer #GoogleScholar #ScholarGoogle #Google #Alternatives #OpenScience #OpenAccess

searx.me

searx - a privacy-respecting, hackable metasearch engine

 
Immagine/foto

Alternatives



Krita drawing - 3508 × 3000 - 3.1 MB - Hippie-propaganda. 8 bit, greyscale, png

Immagine/foto

Licensed CC like all other works on this profile
Immagine/foto

#alternatives #Diaspora #Friendica #community #fire #art #krita #drawing #Illustration
#mywork #ownwork #cc #creativecommons #cc-by